The week before millions of viewers watch the premiere of Ken Burns’ new landmark documentary, The Vietnam War, New Hampshire Humanities will partner with NH PBS to host a series of preview film screenings and facilitated discussions in five communities around the state during the week of September 10.

New Hampshire Humanities announces that Executive Director Deborah Watrous will be leaving New Hampshire this fall for a new position in Boston.

A collaboration between 13 historical societies, museums, and libraries is underway with events scheduled through November.

In 1765, Dr. James Baker of Dorchester stumbled upon Irishman John Hannon crying on the banks of the mighty Neponset River. Hannon, though penniless, possessed the rare skills required to create chocolate, a delicacy exclusive to Europe, and Baker, with pockets bursting, wished to make a name for himself.

What do our current agricultural practices say about us both individually and collectively? How do we understand the social needs and demands of our local agricultural economy, the natural constraints of ecology, and the political imperatives of democracy?

Bill Gates recently called Steven Pinker’s "The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined" the most inspiring book he’s ever read. We asked Dr. Pinker what books have most inspired him. Here’s what he shared...

How does a state with the motto “Live Free or Die” and a celebrated legacy of abolitionism confront and understand its participation in slavery, segregation, and the neglect of African-American history?

How did women serve in World War II? Why do many people believe that the veterans of this war had an easy homecoming? How is the experience of war passed from generation to generation?

James Wright, author of Enduring Vietnam, An American Generation and Its War, will present a talk on the culture of pre-war America, the force the War exerted on social trends and political life, and the stories of the men and women who served, on September 12.

New Hampshire Humanities is pleased to announce the 2017 recipients of our New Hampshire Humanities High School Book Awards, awarded annually to high school juniors who have demonstrated genuine curiosity about history, literature, languages, or philosophy and who hope to deepen that knowledge in college.

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