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New Hampshire Humanities
 

's Programs

A Woman That Keeps Good Orders: Female Tavern Keepers in 18th Century New Hampshire

A Woman That Keeps Good Orders: Female Tavern Keepers in 18th Century New Hampshire

Government regulations, licensing, handling drunks, controlling the flow of information –why would the colonial-era government allow women to own and manage a tavern? Focusing on the life of Ann Jose Harvey Slayton, this presentation will explore the contradictions between the legal status of women versus the social realities of colonial times.

Using documents related to Harvey Slayton’s 20+ year tenure running a tavern, humanist and historian Marcia Schmidt Blaine explores the world of female tavern keepers while asking, “If a tavern was the most disruptive spot in town, why would a woman want to keep one?”

Register

An Evening With U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo

Join us for a special evening with our U.S. Poet Laureate!

Please join us on Monday, May 3 at 6:00 pm for an evening of poetry and discussion with U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo.

In 2019, Joy Harjo was appointed the 23rd United States Poet Laureate and is the first Native American to hold the position. Born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Harjo is an internationally renowned award-winning poet, writer, performer, and saxophone player of the Mvskoke/Creek Nation.

More about Joy Harjo

Join us for this free, online program:

Register

Our special guests:

Denise and Paul Pouliot

Denise is the Sag8moskwa (Head Female Speaker) and Paul is the Sag8mo (Head Male Speaker/Grand Chief) of the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook-Abenaki People that is headquartered in Alton, NH. In addition to their tribal responsibilities, they serve the greater community on several state and regional alliances that deal with race, equality, food insecurity, sustainability, education, climate change, social services, and justice related to marginalized and BIPOC communities. They are founding members of the Indigenous New Hampshire Collaborative Collective.

Dr. Alexandria Peary

Alexandria Peary serves as New Hampshire's Poet Laureate. She holds MFAs in Poetry from the University of Iowa and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a Ph.D. in English from the University of New Hampshire. She is the author of six books and over 150 shorter pieces in leading literary and scholarly journals. Her work has received the Iowa Poetry Prize, the Slope Editions Book Prize, and Writing Studies. She is a professor in the English Department at Salem State University and lives in Londonderry with her husband and two daughters.


Get your Joy Harjo books at your local independent bookseller! Gibson's Bookstore in Concord, NH is generously offering a 20% discount on any of Joy Harjo's books. Click HERE to order, using the special discount code NHH. (Please enjoy the 20% discount on your entire purchase as long as one Harjo book is ordered.)

Appreciating our Nocturnal Pollinators: Impacts of Land Use on Moth Species in the Northeastern U.S.

Presented by Sarah Shearer, MS candidate in the Environmental Studies program with a concentration in Conservation Biology at Antioch University New England

Join us during Pollinator Week (and the official start of summer) to learn more about the mysterious and diverse world of moths! They’re our (mostly) nocturnal neighbors that remain largely unseen but play a very important role as pollinators while supporting native bird and bat populations across the Northeast. Moth diversity has long been considered an indicator of habitat quality and emphasizes the importance of using various native plant, shrub and tree species in our cultivated landscapes and embracing habitat heterogeneity when making land use decisions. We’ll dive into the basics first, and then discuss recent studies involving moths and their implications, along with some ways that everyone can get involved. The methods and results of the author’s own thesis project (Moth Diversity in Managed Inland Pine Barrens and Heathlands of Massachusetts) will be discussed, including ways this study may help inform the future habitat management and restoration priorities of conservation organizations all across the Northeast.

This program is supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

For more information:

https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

Archaeology at The Fells

Archaeology at The Fells

Join Dr. Charles Spencer, curator and archaeologist at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, and Dr. Robert Goodby, humanities scholar and Professor of Anthropology at Franklin Pierce University, for a presentation of their ongoing archaeological research.

The theme of social equity in the field of archaeology over time will be central to this program, which will use the coincidence of place to address the development of archaeology over the last century, contrasting Clarence Hay’s time and interests with those of modern day archaeologists.

Event is free but pre-registration is required. Please call 603-763-4789, ext. 3 or info@thefells.org

Arshay Cooper: A Most Beautiful Thing

Beecology: A Community Scientist Helping Pollinators

Presented by Dr. Robert Gegear, UMASS Dartmouth and Founder of the Beecology Project

Dr. Robert Gegear will update participants on the decline of wild pollinators and the importance of collecting critical ecological information that is needed to develop effective conservation and restoration strategies for threatened pollinator species. The Beecology project was developed to recruit citizen scientists from across the region to digitally collect and submit ecological data on native pollinators. You will learn and practice data collection using the smartphone and web apps developed through this project. Participants will have the chance to use online visualization tools to collect data important for improving the quality of native pollinator habitats.

This project is supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

For more information:

https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

Black Thought: Reading Shakespeare While Being Black

From W. E. B. Du Bois to Toni Morrison, African American writers have often commented on Shakespeare and his status as the epitome of literature written in English. This presentation will explore a variety of ways in which African Americans have explored what it means to be Black in relation to one of English literature's whitest authors.

Civics Teachers Workshop

Civics Teachers Workshop

The New Hampshire Historical Society presents a professional development opportunity geared toward upper elementary educators but useful to teachers of all grade levels, focusing on civics instruction and the foundational principles of American government. Learn about the history and role of the state and national governments, all while exploring ready-made lesson plans, projects, and activities you can introduce to your students in the coming school year.

Register

This project is funded in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

Civics Teachers Workshop (Virtual)

The New Hampshire Historical Society presents a professional development opportunity geared toward upper elementary educators but useful to teachers of all grade levels, focusing on civics instruction and the foundational principles of American government. Learn about the history and role of the state and national governments, all while exploring ready-made lesson plans, projects, and activities you can introduce to your students in the coming school year.

Register

This project is funded in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

Climate in Words and Numbers: How Early Americans Recorded the Weather in Almanacs

Climate in Words and Numbers: How Early Americans Recorded the Weather in Almanacs

As we begin to consider climate change as an everyday problem, it's valuable to know how people did that in the past. With support from the Guggenheim Foundation, Dr. Joyce E. Chaplin is compiling and analyzing a database of manuscript notes about weather in early American almanacs, 1646-1821, out of 10,578 almanacs from nine archives. Her talk focuses on how people recorded the weather in numbers (including degrees Fahrenheit) and in words, from "dull" to "elegant!" These notations are significant as records of a period of climate change, the Little Ice Age, also as records of how people understood and coped with that climatic disruption.

Dr. Joyce E. Chaplin is the James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History at Harvard University.

This program is part of the Community Project Grants-funded series, "Weather-Wise: Historical Records, Contemporary Conversations." For more information, please visit www.shakermuseum.org.

Cooking Up A Picture Book!

A Connections workshop from New Hampshire Humanities for facilitators and teachers with Terry Farish!












Participants in this workshop will:

 

-Learn strategies around picture book writing to improve student reading and writing.

-By taking the first steps to create a picture book of their own, learn techniques to present a picture book to adult students.

-Help students experience the value of their own stories.

-Receive a complimentary copy of A Feast for Joseph  (pictured above) by Terry and OD Bonny with pictures by Ken Daley!

 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER!

Space is limited to 50 participants

About the presenter:



Terry Farish is an author of picture books and young adult novels, many influenced by her trip to Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya and work with the American Red Cross in Vietnam. She wrote A Feast for Joseph in collaboration with South Sudanese musician and writer OD Bonny. Terry was the former Connections program at New Hampshire Humanities manager from 2008-2013 and 2017-2019.







This workshop is dedicated to Johanna Young who loved stories and the natural world.

Daniel Boyne: The Red Rose Crew

Digital Cartography: How does recent technology impact our historical understanding of the White Mountains?

Digital Resources

Digital Resources

Exhibiting Nature’s Nation: The Changing Climate of Art History

Dr. Alan C. Braddock will discuss his major traveling exhibition, Nature's Nation: American Art and Environment, co-curated with Karl Kusserow at the Princeton University Art Museum in 2018-19, along with their award-winning book by the same title. Exploring four centuries of American art and environmental history, the exhibition and book included more than one hundred works addressing climate change and other urgent issues. Nature's Nation also offered a new vision of art history informed by ecocriticism, an ecological approach to cultural interpretation that is dramatically changing scholarship across the humanities.

Alan C. Braddock is the Ralph H. Wark Associate Professor of Art History and American Studies at William & Mary, where he teaches courses on American and global art history, ecology, and environmental history.

This program is part of the Community Project Grants-funded series, "Weather-Wise: Historical Records, Contemporary Conversations." For more information, please visit www.shakermuseum.org.

 

 

Final Presentation of Telling My Story for Humanity - Reflections on Race, Class, and Gender

Final Presentation of Telling My Story for Humanity - Reflections on Race, Class, and Gender

Telling My Story is a platform for members of the New Hampshire community to reflect on race, class, and gender in a collaborative and honest way, while opening up a public space to discuss the root causes of various social issues. Featuring courageous, creative, and compassionate presentations on these urgent themes, ‘Telling My Story for Humanity - Reflections on Race, Class, and Gender’ is an eye-opening presentation not to be missed.

This project was funded in part by a Community Project Grant from New Hampshire Humanities and the Leslie Center for Humanities at Dartmouth College.

Register

Flowering Trees and Shrubs for Pollinators and Wildlife

Presented by Emma Erler, field specialist and garden expert for UNH Cooperative Extension

When gardeners think of designing a landscape for pollinators, they may imagine a colorful bed of herbaceous flowers. However, flowering trees and shrubs are essential parts of the habitat required to support a wide variety of pollinators and other wildlife species. Not only do they provide food, but they also offer year-round shelter and nesting places. In this presentation you’ll learn about blooming trees and shrubs that provide both beauty and important habitat in the garden.

This program is supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

For more information: https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

Garden for Wildlife – Attracting Birds, Butterflies and Other Backyard Wildlife

Presented by David Mizejewski, naturalist and television host with National Wildlife Federation

Naturalist David Mizejewski shares how to create a beautiful garden or landscape that fits into the local ecosystem and supports birds, butterflies, bees and a whole host of other wonderful wildlife neighbors. David will discuss native plants, the four components of habitat and sustainable gardening. He’ll also share how you can achieve the National Wildlife Federation’s “Certified Wildlife Habitat” recognition for your garden space.

For more information: https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

HEMINGWAY Screening & Discussion

New Hampshire PBS, in partnership with New Hampshire Humanities and the New Hampshire Writers’ Project, presents an online screening and discussion of the new Ken Burns film, HEMINGWAY, on Thursday, April 1st at 6 pm

HEMINGWAY is a three-part series, directed by Ken Burns and longtime collaborator Lynn Novick, that paints an intimate picture of Hemingway, the writer, who captured on paper the complexities of the human condition in spare and profound prose and whose work remains deeply influential around the world. The film also penetrates the myth of Hemingway, the man’s man, to reveal a deeply troubled and ultimately tragic figure and explores Hemingway’s limitations and biases as an artist and a man of his time.

After the 30-minute HEMINGWAY screener, New Hampshire Humanities Public Programs Director Tricia Peone will engage in a conversation with HEMINGWAY documentary writer Geoffrey C. Ward, Board Chair of New Hampshire Writers' Project Masheri Chappelle, and New Hampshire author Robert Wheeler. 

Register

The new Ken Burns documentary HEMINGWAY airs on New Hampshire PBS on April 5, 6, & 7 at 8 pm.


Corporate funding for HEMINGWAY was provided by Bank of America. Major funding was provided by the Annenberg Foundation, The Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, and by ‘The Better Angels Society,’ and its members John & Leslie McQuown, the Elizabeth Ruth Wallace Living Trust, John & Catherine Debs, the Fullerton Family Charitable Fund, the Kissick Family Foundation, Gail M. Elden, Gilchrist & Amy Berg, Robert & Beverly Grappone, Mauree Jane & Mark Perry; and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS.

Hidden Stories: Looking into the Lives of our Wild Neighbors

Hilary Gehman: Women’s Voices in Rowing

It Happened In New Hampshire: Black History in the Granite State

The first enslaved African arrived in New Hampshire in 1645. There’s a long, rich Black history in the Granite State. Colonial New Hampshire newspapers testify to the state’s slave trade, runaways, abolitionists, and anti-abolitionist activities, followed by conflicting opinions about the Civil War. In the 20th century, the legacy of that early history was reflected in news about de facto segregation in housing and public places.

For this panel, you will hear the story of Black Revolutionary War soldier Jude Hall of Exeter and first-hand stories about the Civil Rights Movement in New Hampshire including the Reverse Freedom rides of 1962 to our state.

Presenters: Sharon Jones, singer and activist; Renay Allen, author; Barbara Baker Williams, Reverse Freedom Rider

Moderator: Senator David Watters, Ph.D.


The winter Tea Talk series, presented by the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire (BHTNH) and sponsored in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities, is a series of participatory lectures related to New Hampshire’s Black history and African American culture. These events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.blackheritagetrailnh.org/tea-talks.

Register

Italian Americans in History and Film

Italian Americans in History and Film

Italian American culture is part of our everyday lives and has contributed to American culture for almost a century and a half. But who are those Italian Americans? What’s their history? We have seen them in movies, mostly as mafia men, what about the women? This talk looks at Italian American culture, the movies it has inspired, and the politics of Italian American-ness. Presented by Dr. Graziella Parati, Professor of Italian Studies at Dartmouth.


REGISTER

Jim Dreher: Technological Revolution in Rowing

Jose Clemente Orozco and the Epic of “Greater America”

In this talk, Dr. Mary K. Coffey (Dartmouth) examines Mexican Muralist Jose Clemente Orozco’s contributions to formulations of the American epic in the 1930s through an analysis of his fresco cycle, The Epic of American Civilization, painted at Dartmouth College between 1932 and 34. The presentation will focus on scenes in the “Modern” half of the cycle that pertain to the relationship between what was called “Anglo” and “Hispano” America. She demonstrates how Orozco’s critical engagement with period formulations of Pan-Americanism challenged ideas about US America’s exceptionalism while also considering how his challenge can inform to contemporary debates over race and immigration.

Mary Coffey is Professor of Art History at Dartmouth College. She specializes in the history of modern Mexican visual culture, with an emphasis on Mexican muralism and the politics of exhibition. She also publishes in the fields of American art, Latin American cultural studies, and museum studies. She has published essays on a broad range of visual culture, from Mexican folk art to motorcycles to eugenics exhibitions. She is the author of  How a Revolutionary Art Became Official Culture: Murals, Museums, and the Mexican State (Duke, 2012), and Orozco's American Epic: Myth, History, and the Melancholy of Race (Duke, 2020) which offers the first book-length analysis of Jose Clemente Orozco's 24 panel fresco, The Epic of American Civilization, painted at Dartmouth College between 1932-34. 

Register  

Kathy Keeler on Women in Crew Racing

Mapping a Mid-19th Century Surveying Conflict

Mapping the Ice Age Geology of the White Mountains, New Hampshire

Mary Baker Eddy - HTG Online

Mary Baker Eddy - HTG Online

Dr. Nicole Ruane (UNH) will discuss Mary Baker Eddy, New Hampshire's most important and innovative religious thinker. Mark Twain called Eddy "the most interesting woman that ever lived, and the most extraordinary." The church Eddy founded (The Church of Christ, Scientist), profoundly affected both American ideologies of religion as well as public opinion of the role of women in society. This program discusses the ways in which Eddy's experience as a woman in Victorian-era America influenced her gendered understanding of God as well as the nature of humanity, the body, health, and the place of women in powerful organizations.

Register

More Than Just a Pretty Picture

More Than Just a Pretty Picture

Native Bees of New England – Their Diversity and Natural History

Presented by Michael Veit, high school biology teacher and native bee enthusiast

How many kinds of bees can you name: honey bees, bumble bees, sweat bees perhaps? Most people are familiar with our non-native honey bees and their role in pollinating commercial crops, but few are aware of the great diversity of native bees that we have in our region and the roles that they play in pollinating our indigenous plants. This program will explore the wild bees of our region, their diversity, beauty, fascinating life histories, and the importance of native bee conservation. 

This program is supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

For more information: https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

Native Predatory Wasps: Their Role as Pollinators and Beneficial Insects

Presented by Heather Holm, biologist, pollinator conservationist, and award-winning author.

Native bees and predatory wasps share the same lineage and also share many behaviors and habitat requirements. Predatory wasps feed their offspring invertebrates (insects and spiders) and bees diverged from this carnivorous diet to feed their offspring plant-based food (pollen and nectar). Flower-rich landscapes provide critical habitat for both adult bees and wasps because they each consume flower nectar. In addition, wasps need diverse, flower-rich landscapes to hunt for their prey. Heather will highlight many amazing natural history and biology facts about native wasps illustrating their nesting habitat, prey specificity, and the ecosystem services they provide – pest insect population control and pollination.

This program is supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

For more information: https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant Workshop

This workshop will introduce prospective applicants to the Community Project Grant application and provide information about how to submit a competitive proposal.

Topics covered will include:

  • An overview of New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grants
  • Community Project Grant requirements
  • How a proposal is evaluated by NHH
  • How to complete the CPG Application and tips for crafting a compelling project narrative.
  • How to complete the Budget Template and meet the matching fund requirements.

 

Register 

New Hampshire Through the Lens of a Camera

New Hampshire Through the Lens of a Camera

NH History Institute

NH History Institute

Learn more about the state you love! The New Hampshire Historical Society presents the New Hampshire History Institute for upper elementary educators, a special three-day workshop running from August 2-4. This boot camp in New Hampshire history will include sessions on the Abenaki, early colonial settlement, American Revolution, tourism, immigration, and civics; age-appropriate social studies and ELA methodology; and an introduction to "Moose on the Loose: Social Studies for Granite State Kids," the new state social studies curriculum for upper elementary grades created by the New Hampshire Historical Society.

"Moose on the Loose" integrates high-quality social studies instruction with English language arts, math, and science requirements.

Register

This project is funded in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

This three-day workshop runs from August 2-4

NH History Institute (Virtual)

NH History Institute (Virtual)

Learn more about the state you love! The New Hampshire Historical Society presents the New Hampshire History Institute for upper elementary educators, a special three-day virtual workshop running from August 9-11. This boot camp in New Hampshire history will include sessions on the Abenaki, early colonial settlement, American Revolution, tourism, immigration, and civics; age-appropriate social studies and ELA methodology; and an introduction to "Moose on the Loose: Social Studies for Granite State Kids," the new state social studies curriculum for upper elementary grades created by the New Hampshire Historical Society.

"Moose on the Loose" integrates high-quality social studies instruction with English language arts, math, and science requirements.

Register

This project is funded in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

This three-day virtual workshop runs from August 9-11

NH Young Leaders Roundtable Discussion

NH Young Leaders Roundtable Discussion

Hear from young leaders such as the co-founder of the Black Lives Matter Manchester movement, a state representative, a school board member, a campaign manager, and a legislation tracker, who have taken actions such as planning walk-outs, organizing rallies, holding public office, speaking before the NH legislature and more. Please join us for this nonpartisan public discussion featuring five community leaders.

Register

On Shaky Ground: Students of Color in Predominantly White Institutions

For many students of color, being in an environment in which most of the people are different from themselves is a challenging experience. Students of color who are not able to feel connected to and a part of the university may feel alienated, inadequate, and depressed. Many experience pressure to adopt the values, beliefs, and attitudes of the dominant white culture while simultaneously feeling pressure to abandon their own culture.

Hear from a group of young New Hampshire students as they identify some of the social pressures they experience while attending a white educational institution, and ways in which they navigate campus environments to achieve self-realization and achieve academic success while creating a sense of belonging.

Presenters: Rekha Mahadevan, Berwick Academy Class of 2023; Grace Morelli, University of New Hampshire Class of 2021; Curtis Linton, University of New Hampshire Class of 2021, Mechanical Engineer; Ken Holmes, Senior Vice Provost for Student Life, University of New Hampshire

Moderator: Jada Hebra, Senior Vice President & Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer, Southern NH University


The winter Tea Talk series, presented by the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire (BHTNH) and sponsored in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities, is a series of participatory lectures related to New Hampshire’s Black history and African American culture. These events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.blackheritagetrailnh.org/tea-talks.

Register

Paddle Trip on the Pagôntegok (Contoocook) River

Plague: Stories of Epidemics

Dr. Katherine Gaudet (UNH) explores stories of epidemics in our next HTG Online event. Are we living through a Biblical plague? Or are we feeling the wrath of the gods on our society, like Thebes in the time of Oedipus? This talk considers what stories, histories, and legends of epidemics have to tell us about how to understand our own time.

Register

Politics & Civil Rights: An Evening with Yamiche Alcindor

Politics & Civil Rights: An Evening with Yamiche Alcindor

Yamiche Alcindor is the White House correspondent for PBS NewsHour and a political contributor for NBC News and MSNBC. Previously, she was a national reporter for The New York Times, covering politics and social issues, and also a reporter with USA Today. Alcindor has reported extensively on the intersection of race and politics. Alcindor earned a master's degree in broadcast news and documentary filmmaking from New York University and a bachelor's in English, government and African American studies from Georgetown University. A native of Miami, FL, Alcindor is married to a fellow journalist and is the daughter of Haitian immigrants.


In this talk, Yamiche Alcindor looks at the current political issues facing America and shares her experiences in reporting on the 2016 and 2020 Presidential campaigns. She will discuss how her decision to pursue journalism came at 16 years old when she learned the tragic truth about the 1955 murder of Emmett Till and the launch of the civil rights movement. She also offers her observations on the White House, her thoughts on how social justice issues are impacting the country’s future, and her analysis of the latest stories surrounding the 2020 elections.

Pollinators 101

Presented by Vicki J. Brown, natural resource steward and founding organizer of Pollinator Pathways NH

Who are "the pollinators"? Learn about the most common types of wild pollinators, their vital ecological role, and how we can profoundly impact the diversity of pollinators in our own yards and communities.

This program is supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

For more information: https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

Power of One: A Connections Book Discussion Workshop

This book discussion workshop is designed to help adult educators lead their own book discussions with students using Connections humanities themed literature.
This program will be presented by Mary Nolin, Program Manager - Connections; and Emily Archer. writer and Connections facilitator.

Participants in this workshop will receive:

  • An opportunity to learn from an experienced Connections facilitator.
  • Practical and easy to implement strategies to lead their own book discussion.
  • Two free Connections books!
  • Access to curriculum and supplemental resources around the books.
  • Digital resources for online book discussions.
  • Information about our new “Book Grants” from Connections!
Race & Care of the Soul

Race & Care of the Soul

Until the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer in 2020, few questioned the brutal hand of racism as orchestrated through police forces, our legal system, schools, workplaces and other institutions. The ensuing mass protests across the U.S. forced us to see the actual consequences of racism in a new light.

In a conversation with author Thomas Moore, participants will explore the effect of racism on our collective and individual Soul. Basing his writing on the ancient model of “care of the soul"—which provided a religious context for viewing the events of everyday life—Moore examines the connections between spirituality and the problems of individuals. He offers a therapeutic lifestyle that focuses on sacredness in ordinary things. Now, more than ever, we need to pause―intentionally―and encounter the Divine.


Presenters: Thomas Moore, author, Care of the Soul; Reginald Wilburn, Department of English, University of New Hampshire

Moderator: Rev. Lauren Smith, Director of Stewardship and Development, Unitarian Universalist Association


The winter Tea Talk series, presented by the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire (BHTNH) and sponsored in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities, is a series of participatory lectures related to New Hampshire’s Black history and African American culture. These events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.blackheritagetrailnh.org/tea-talks.

Register

Racism, Land & The American Farming Landscape

Racism, Land & The American Farming Landscape

In 1920, there were 949,889 Black farmers. A century later, according to the 2017 Census of Agriculture, only 35,470 remained.

This panel will investigate the contributing factors to this enormous land loss including discriminatory practices, such as the denial of USDA loans. and slow handling of civil rights complaints. Presenters will also share the innovative ways Black New England Farmers are reclaiming the land and sowing the seeds of health and empowerment.

Presenters: Reginald Jackson, Emeritus Professor of Communications at Simmons College, MA; Lydia Clemmons, President of Clemmons Family Farm, VT; Jarrad Nwameme 

Moderator: Meghan Howey, Professor in Anthropology, University of New Hampshire 


The winter Tea Talk series, presented by the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire (BHTNH) and sponsored in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities, is a series of participatory lectures related to New Hampshire’s Black history and African American culture. These events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://blackheritagetrailnh.org/tea-talks.

Register

Raised Relief: Three Dimensional Maps of the White Mountains

David Govatski presents the story of Raised Relief maps, which are three-dimensional representations of a portion of the Earth’s surface. These maps have a long history of use, dating back over 2,000-years to the Qin and Han dynasties. Learn about the history of relief maps in our region, starting with the 1872 George Snow Relief Map of the White Mountains and other early maps, to the unique process developed by the A.M.C. in 1931, to the raised relief maps produced by the Civilian Conservation Corps.

Presented as part of the Museum’s summer exhibition: Wayfinding: Maps of the White Mountains. The Summer 2020 Speaker Series was made possible with support from New Hampshire Humanities, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Humanities. 

Reading Shakespeare While Being Black

From W. E. B. Du Bois to Toni Morrison, African American writers have often commented on Shakespeare and his status as the epitome of literature written in English. This presentation will explore a variety of ways in which African Americans have explored what it means to be Black in relation to one of English literature's whitest authors.


RSVP

The Black Church: This is Our Story, This is Our Song

The Black Church: This is Our Story, This is Our Song

The Bride Wore Purple

The Sunapee Historical Society presents an illustrated lecture by Astrida Schaeffer, Clothing Historian & Exhibition Specialist, “The Bride Wore Purple” describing a collection including a purple wedding dress worn by Susan J. Stocker in 1868.

The Celebration of Cultural Connections

The Celebration of Cultural Connections

The Celebration of Cultural Connections is part of Tammi J. Truax’s Poet Laureate project, Building Bridges through Poetry, designed to engage the community in a study of Japanese culture and poetry. At the celebration, the winners of Truax’s poetry broadside contest will be revealed, along with a new digital gallery; the audience will then enjoy a presentation by Monica Chiu, UNH Professor of English, specializing in Asian American studies, who will address questions regarding the intersection of art and poetry, as well as cross-cultural sharing. We hope this event will be attended by people from as far away as Japan.

Please email info@pplp.org for the Zoom invite to attend.

The Civic Reckoning That Was 2020 (and What it Means for Teaching and Learning Civics)


On January 8, 2020 New Hampshire Humanities hosted this audience-interactive online program on the civic principles at the center of 2020’s meltdown. Dianna Gahlsdorf Terrell, Ph.D. (Saint Anselm College) led this talk on core democratic principles, how they are — and can be — taught in New Hampshire’s classrooms, and what civic knowledge must be most durable to withstand our democracy’s more challenging times.


Additional Resources


 

This program was funded by the 'Why It Matters: Civic and Electoral Participation' initiative, administered by the Federation of State Humanities Councils and funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The History of the Great New England Hurricane as Documented by the People

The History of the Great New England Hurricane as Documented by the People

The Great New England Hurricane of 1938 is the most devastating tropical cyclone of all time to affect the region. Only two other comparable storms have been documented before or since. The effects of the storm were all encompassing and affected the entire region and its surroundings, and those that experienced it found many ways to document it (scrapbooks, photographic collections, objects made with fallen wood, songs, poems, fictional stories, as well as a massive number of historical accounts, and technical reports. Dr. Lourdes Avilés has been studying the storm for more than ten years and published a book on its science and history that weaves an interdisciplinary account of the storm and its effects. During that time, she has collected many artifacts, stories, and other pieces of interest that she will be sharing during her talk. She will also put the storm in the context of previous New England Hurricanes and what climate change means for such storms. www.takenbystorm1938.com

Dr. Lourdes Avilés, a Trustee of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, is Professor of Meteorology at Plymouth State University.

This program is part of the Community Project Grants-funded series, "Weather-Wise: Historical Records, Contemporary Conversations." For more information, please visit www.shakermuseum.org.

The Howling Storm: Weather, Climate, and the American Civil War

Dr. Kenneth W. Noe explores how the Civil War's unusual weather affected both the battlefield and the home front. Traditional histories describe the conflict as a war between North and South. Dr. Noe suggests it should instead be understood as a war between the North, the South, and the weather. He retells the history of the conflagration with a focus on the ways in which weather and climate shaped the outcomes of battles and campaigns. Events such as floods and droughts affecting the Confederate homefront constricted soldiers’ food supply, lowered morale, and undercut the government’s efforts to boost nationalist sentiment. By contrast, the superior equipment and open supply lines enjoyed by Union soldiers enabled them to cope successfully with the South’s extreme conditions and, ultimately, secure victory in 1865.

Kenneth W. Noe is the Draughon Professor of Southern History at Auburn University.

This program is part of the Community Project Grants-funded series, "Weather-Wise: Historical Records, Contemporary Conversations." For more information, please visit www.shakermuseum.org.

 

The Map is Not the Territory: The Limitations and Power of Mapping

The Power of Place: Martha’s Vineyard and the Growth of the Black Elite

The Power of Place: Martha’s Vineyard and the Growth of the Black Elite

For Black Americans traveling in the era of segregation presented serious dangers from hotels and restaurants that refused to accommodate them to hostile “sundown towns,” where posted signs warned people of color that they were banned after nightfall. Out of necessity, Black travelers would flock to towns like Oak Bluffs where they would be welcomed. Initially established by freed slaves who sought shelter there after slavery was abolished. Then, in the 1930s and 1940s, as African Americans in urban centers like New York, Washington, D.C. and Boston began to establish themselves as part of the middle and upper-middle class, they flocked to the East Coast shoreline in summer to take in the beach and the bonfires.

For this conversation, panelists will share the history and personal stories of the growth of the Black Elite on the Vineyard and how this upwardly mobile Black community recast the borders of white spaces.

Panelists:
Gretchen Sorin, author, Driving While Black;  African American Travel and the Road to Civil Rights; Joanne Dowdell, Senior Vice President Global Government Affairs at News Corp; Loren Van Allen, member of the Shearer Family, owners of Shearer Cottage.

Moderator: Bithiah Carter, President & CEO, New England Blacks in Philanthropy 



The winter Tea Talk series, presented by the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire (BHTNH) and sponsored in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities, is a series of participatory lectures related to New Hampshire’s Black history and African American culture. These events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.blackheritagetrailnh.org/tea-talks.

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Top Chefs: Celebrity Cooks and Social Capital from the Italian Renaissance Court to Today

Today we take for granted that great chefs become famous, and that they can influence social consciousness and public policy, not through private wealth or direct lobbying, but more often by leveraging the rarity and unique nature of their expertise. Everyone eats, but not everyone cooks, and cooking well is a practice that takes care, attention, and training. Nonetheless, cooking does not usually take place on stage or in front of television cameras, and it was not always the case that the lowly cook in the back of the house received accolades from those who were enjoying the food out in the dining room. So when did it become possible to parlay good cooking into social and political capital? Looking back at some of the earliest chefs who achieved fame and fortune in Italy we can find the roots of the celebrity chef culture we know so well today.

 

Danielle Callegari (Ph.D., Certified Specialist of Wine) is Assistant Professor in the Department of French and Italian at Dartmouth College and Councilor of the Dante Society of America. Her teaching and research focuses on premodern Italian literature and food and wine studies. She has published on a variety of subjects including Dante, medieval food and wine culture, early modern women’s writing and religion, and modern Italian food and politics. Her first monograph, Dante’s Gluttons: Food and Society in Medieval Italian Literature, is forthcoming with Amsterdam University Press.

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Topography, 3D Art, and the N.H. 4000 Foot Club: A Lecture with Demonstration

Topography, 3D Art, and the N.H. 4000 Foot Club: A Lecture with Demonstration

Climbing all the 4000 footers in NH is a goal for many hikers in the Granite State. Learn how an interest in hiking, orienteering, map making, and teaching topography led retired middle school science teacher, Mark Thomas, to create a collection of painted 3D models of all the 48 mountains on one of New Hampshire's favorite hiking bucket lists. Plus, enjoy a demonstration of how these unique 3D models are made!

Presented as part of the Museum’s summer exhibition: Wayfinding: Maps of the White Mountains. The Summer 2020 Speaker Series was made possible with support from New Hampshire Humanities, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Humanities. 

Understanding Homelessness in New Hampshire

Homelessness has become a problem for many communities in New Hampshire. It is a preventable problem but most of the strategies communities have used to prevent and address it haven’t worked well. In this presentation, Dr. Vissing will explore the history of homelessness and commonly used approaches to understand it and do something about it. Participants in this virtual presentation will be encouraged to share perspectives, questions and ideas.

Wayfinding in Their Own Words: Historical Journals, Maps and Hikers of the White Mountains

Have you ever tried to retrace the steps of an explorer from before your time? Attempted to use an old map to guide you around a modern landscape? In this presentation by AMC Archivist, Becky Fullerton, we’ll look at the White Mountains through early 20th century hiker journal excerpts, historical and contemporary photos, and maps. Explore in words and pictures how wayfinding and backpacking have and have not changed over the course of a century or more. These journal-keepers of old will describe scenes of logging and forest fires, getting lost and finding their way again, wilderness and mountaintop bliss as they experienced it.

Presented as part of the Museum’s summer exhibition: Wayfinding: Maps of the White Mountains. The Summer 2020 Speaker Series was made possible with support from New Hampshire Humanities, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Humanities. 

Wayfinding: Maps of the White Mountains

Wayfinding: Maps of the White Mountains

Join the Museum of the White Mountains for a lecture on the Emerging LiDAR Landscape, the first lecture in their Summer Speaker Series, Wayfinding: Maps of the White Mountains. Rick Chormann, State Geologist and Director of the NH Geological Survey, will introduce participants to LiDAR technology and its potential to revolutionize geologic mapping and digital terrain analysis; discuss the history of behind New Hampshire’s many stone walls; and introduce the NH Stone Wall Mapping project.

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This project is funded in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

William W. Treat Lecture Series 1: Civic Health - Renewing Trust Among Neighbors

William W. Treat Lecture Series 2: A Polarized Country - Can Schools Help Bridge the Divide?

William W. Treat Lecture Series 2: A Polarized Country - Can Schools Help Bridge the Divide?

How can schools in New Hampshire and nationally navigate polarization and inequity to help heal our country’s division? How can schools support civic participation and democracy? Join two thought leaders, Dianna Gahlsdorf Terrell of Saint Anselm College and Peter Levine of Tufts University in this interactive conversation and learn about current efforts and research.

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This project is funded in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

Writing While Black: The Afrofuturistic Writer

Writing While Black: The Afrofuturistic Writer

In recent years, there has been an uptick, if not an actual surge, of works by science fiction writers of color, a literary genre where Black voices and characters have been historically absent. For writers of color the distinction between science fiction and fantasy, two imaginative genres is often blurred. Why? Because access to the scientific knowledge from which science fiction often is derived has been denied to people of the African diaspora for much of history. And the classification of what is and is not scientific is frequently a matter of dispute and Eurocentric. This panel will explore Black writers and characters in a genre where they have not been expected to excel.

Presenters: Sheree Renée Thomas, author; Nisi Shawl, author

Moderator: Dennis Britton, Ph.D., Department of English, University of New Hampshire

The winter Tea Talk series, presented by the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire (BHTNH) and sponsored in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities, is a series of participatory lectures related to New Hampshire’s Black history and African American culture. These events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.blackheritagetrailnh.org/tea-talks.

Register

`If I Am Not For Myself, Who Will Be for Me?` George Washington's Runaway Slave

`If I Am Not For Myself, Who Will Be for Me?` George Washington's Runaway Slave

Oney Judge Staines, according to the Constitution, was only three-fifths of a person. To her masters, George and Martha Washington, she was merely "the girl." All she wanted was the freedom to control her own actions, but her account of escaping the Executive Mansion in Philadelphia, fleeing north and establishing a life in New Hampshire is not a typical runaway story. Portrayed by Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti, Oney's tale provides an alternative perspective on the new nation's social, political, and economic development, from one whose personal experience so contradicted the promise of the principles embodied in the nation's founding documents.