Ann McClellan

Ann McClellan is professor of English and Associate Provost at Plymouth State University where she teaches 19th and 20th century British literature. She is the author of How British Women Writers Transformed the Campus Novel (2012), Sherlock's World: Fanfiction and the Reimagining of BBC's Sherlock (2018), and several articles on cultural topics ranging from servants on screen to social media, fan fiction, and Sherlock Holmes. She is currently writing a new monograph on race and Sherlock Holmes adaptations.

Contact

Ann McClellan
Plymouth, NH 03264
akmcclellan@plymouth.edu
Work Phone: 603-535-3500

Ann McClellan's Programs

(Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes

(Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes

The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry. Why is Sherlock Holmes so popular? Ann McClellan's presentation explores the origins of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective and tracks his incarnations in literature, film, advertising, and modern media in order to crack the case of the most popular detective.

This program is also available as an online presentation.

Life Downstairs: British Servant Culture in Fact, Fiction, and Film

Life Downstairs: British Servant Culture in Fact, Fiction, and Film

While servant narratives have been popular for centuries, there seems to be a resurging interest in these stories in recent decades. Many contemporary British and North American writers, filmmakers, and television executives have turned to master/servant relationships as their subject matter. Films like The Remains of the Day and Gosford Park garnered numerous Oscar nominations and substantial box office profits. PBS created such classics as Upstairs, Downstairs and Manor House, as well as the phenomenally successful Downton Abbey! Even mainstream American television has piloted its own versions of the British servant in shows as wide-ranging as The Fresh Prince of Bel Air to reality TV's Supernanny. Join Ann McClellan as she explores the history behind the rise and fall of British servants and why Americans are so fascinated by their stories on page and screen.

This program is also available as an online presentation.

Storytelling in the Digital Age

Storytelling in the Digital Age

More and more, the contemporary reading public is turning to digital technology as a means of experiencing literature. The Internet, hyperlink technology, the popularity of e-readers, and readers' desire for multimedia experiences seem, on the surface, to put the future of the book at risk. Scholars for decades have been lamenting the rise of technology and prophesying the death of the book and the humanities. However, rather than seeing one technology (the Internet) defeat another (the printed book), perhaps we are witnessing the dawn of a new genre: digital literature. In an interactive discussion, participants will explore how technology is affecting how we read, write, and experience stories. We will learn about the history and development of electronic literature and hypertext media, the rise of social media and how it affects digital literature (fan fiction, online role playing games, Twitterature, etc.); and the rise of the emerging field of transmedia storytelling where media conglomerates purposefully design texts to work across multiple media platforms.

This program is also available as an online presentation.