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Appreciating our Nocturnal Pollinators: Impacts of Land Use on Moth Species in the Northeastern U.S.

Presented by Sarah Shearer, MS candidate in the Environmental Studies program with a concentration in Conservation Biology at Antioch University New England

Join us during Pollinator Week (and the official start of summer) to learn more about the mysterious and diverse world of moths! They’re our (mostly) nocturnal neighbors that remain largely unseen but play a very important role as pollinators while supporting native bird and bat populations across the Northeast. Moth diversity has long been considered an indicator of habitat quality and emphasizes the importance of using various native plant, shrub and tree species in our cultivated landscapes and embracing habitat heterogeneity when making land use decisions. We’ll dive into the basics first, and then discuss recent studies involving moths and their implications, along with some ways that everyone can get involved. The methods and results of the author’s own thesis project (Moth Diversity in Managed Inland Pine Barrens and Heathlands of Massachusetts) will be discussed, including ways this study may help inform the future habitat management and restoration priorities of conservation organizations all across the Northeast.

This program is supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

For more information:

https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

Archaeology at The Fells

Archaeology at The Fells

Join Dr. Charles Spencer, curator and archaeologist at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, and Dr. Robert Goodby, humanities scholar and Professor of Anthropology at Franklin Pierce University, for a presentation of their ongoing archaeological research.

The theme of social equity in the field of archaeology over time will be central to this program, which will use the coincidence of place to address the development of archaeology over the last century, contrasting Clarence Hay’s time and interests with those of modern day archaeologists.

Event is free but pre-registration is required. Please call 603-763-4789, ext. 3 or info@thefells.org

Beecology: A Community Scientist Helping Pollinators

Presented by Dr. Robert Gegear, UMASS Dartmouth and Founder of the Beecology Project

Dr. Robert Gegear will update participants on the decline of wild pollinators and the importance of collecting critical ecological information that is needed to develop effective conservation and restoration strategies for threatened pollinator species. The Beecology project was developed to recruit citizen scientists from across the region to digitally collect and submit ecological data on native pollinators. You will learn and practice data collection using the smartphone and web apps developed through this project. Participants will have the chance to use online visualization tools to collect data important for improving the quality of native pollinator habitats.

This project is supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

For more information:

https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

Civics Teachers Workshop

Civics Teachers Workshop

The New Hampshire Historical Society presents a professional development opportunity geared toward upper elementary educators but useful to teachers of all grade levels, focusing on civics instruction and the foundational principles of American government. Learn about the history and role of the state and national governments, all while exploring ready-made lesson plans, projects, and activities you can introduce to your students in the coming school year.

Register

This project is funded in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

Civics Teachers Workshop (Virtual)

The New Hampshire Historical Society presents a professional development opportunity geared toward upper elementary educators but useful to teachers of all grade levels, focusing on civics instruction and the foundational principles of American government. Learn about the history and role of the state and national governments, all while exploring ready-made lesson plans, projects, and activities you can introduce to your students in the coming school year.

Register

This project is funded in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

Climate in Words and Numbers: How Early Americans Recorded the Weather in Almanacs

Climate in Words and Numbers: How Early Americans Recorded the Weather in Almanacs

As we begin to consider climate change as an everyday problem, it's valuable to know how people did that in the past. With support from the Guggenheim Foundation, Dr. Joyce E. Chaplin is compiling and analyzing a database of manuscript notes about weather in early American almanacs, 1646-1821, out of 10,578 almanacs from nine archives. Her talk focuses on how people recorded the weather in numbers (including degrees Fahrenheit) and in words, from "dull" to "elegant!" These notations are significant as records of a period of climate change, the Little Ice Age, also as records of how people understood and coped with that climatic disruption.

Dr. Joyce E. Chaplin is the James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History at Harvard University.

This program is part of the Community Project Grants-funded series, "Weather-Wise: Historical Records, Contemporary Conversations." For more information, please visit www.shakermuseum.org.

Exhibiting Nature’s Nation: The Changing Climate of Art History

Dr. Alan C. Braddock will discuss his major traveling exhibition, Nature's Nation: American Art and Environment, co-curated with Karl Kusserow at the Princeton University Art Museum in 2018-19, along with their award-winning book by the same title. Exploring four centuries of American art and environmental history, the exhibition and book included more than one hundred works addressing climate change and other urgent issues. Nature's Nation also offered a new vision of art history informed by ecocriticism, an ecological approach to cultural interpretation that is dramatically changing scholarship across the humanities.

Alan C. Braddock is the Ralph H. Wark Associate Professor of Art History and American Studies at William & Mary, where he teaches courses on American and global art history, ecology, and environmental history.

This program is part of the Community Project Grants-funded series, "Weather-Wise: Historical Records, Contemporary Conversations." For more information, please visit www.shakermuseum.org.

 

 

Final Presentation of Telling My Story for Humanity - Reflections on Race, Class, and Gender

Final Presentation of Telling My Story for Humanity - Reflections on Race, Class, and Gender

Telling My Story is a platform for members of the New Hampshire community to reflect on race, class, and gender in a collaborative and honest way, while opening up a public space to discuss the root causes of various social issues. Featuring courageous, creative, and compassionate presentations on these urgent themes, ‘Telling My Story for Humanity - Reflections on Race, Class, and Gender’ is an eye-opening presentation not to be missed.

This project was funded in part by a Community Project Grant from New Hampshire Humanities and the Leslie Center for Humanities at Dartmouth College.

Register

Flowering Trees and Shrubs for Pollinators and Wildlife

Presented by Emma Erler, field specialist and garden expert for UNH Cooperative Extension

When gardeners think of designing a landscape for pollinators, they may imagine a colorful bed of herbaceous flowers. However, flowering trees and shrubs are essential parts of the habitat required to support a wide variety of pollinators and other wildlife species. Not only do they provide food, but they also offer year-round shelter and nesting places. In this presentation you’ll learn about blooming trees and shrubs that provide both beauty and important habitat in the garden.

This program is supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

For more information: https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

Garden for Wildlife – Attracting Birds, Butterflies and Other Backyard Wildlife

Presented by David Mizejewski, naturalist and television host with National Wildlife Federation

Naturalist David Mizejewski shares how to create a beautiful garden or landscape that fits into the local ecosystem and supports birds, butterflies, bees and a whole host of other wonderful wildlife neighbors. David will discuss native plants, the four components of habitat and sustainable gardening. He’ll also share how you can achieve the National Wildlife Federation’s “Certified Wildlife Habitat” recognition for your garden space.

For more information: https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

It Happened In New Hampshire: Black History in the Granite State

The first enslaved African arrived in New Hampshire in 1645. There’s a long, rich Black history in the Granite State. Colonial New Hampshire newspapers testify to the state’s slave trade, runaways, abolitionists, and anti-abolitionist activities, followed by conflicting opinions about the Civil War. In the 20th century, the legacy of that early history was reflected in news about de facto segregation in housing and public places.

For this panel, you will hear the story of Black Revolutionary War soldier Jude Hall of Exeter and first-hand stories about the Civil Rights Movement in New Hampshire including the Reverse Freedom rides of 1962 to our state.

Presenters: Sharon Jones, singer and activist; Renay Allen, author; Barbara Baker Williams, Reverse Freedom Rider

Moderator: Senator David Watters, Ph.D.


The winter Tea Talk series, presented by the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire (BHTNH) and sponsored in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities, is a series of participatory lectures related to New Hampshire’s Black history and African American culture. These events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.blackheritagetrailnh.org/tea-talks.

Register

Native Bees of New England – Their Diversity and Natural History

Presented by Michael Veit, high school biology teacher and native bee enthusiast

How many kinds of bees can you name: honey bees, bumble bees, sweat bees perhaps? Most people are familiar with our non-native honey bees and their role in pollinating commercial crops, but few are aware of the great diversity of native bees that we have in our region and the roles that they play in pollinating our indigenous plants. This program will explore the wild bees of our region, their diversity, beauty, fascinating life histories, and the importance of native bee conservation. 

This program is supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

For more information: https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

Native Predatory Wasps: Their Role as Pollinators and Beneficial Insects

Presented by Heather Holm, biologist, pollinator conservationist, and award-winning author.

Native bees and predatory wasps share the same lineage and also share many behaviors and habitat requirements. Predatory wasps feed their offspring invertebrates (insects and spiders) and bees diverged from this carnivorous diet to feed their offspring plant-based food (pollen and nectar). Flower-rich landscapes provide critical habitat for both adult bees and wasps because they each consume flower nectar. In addition, wasps need diverse, flower-rich landscapes to hunt for their prey. Heather will highlight many amazing natural history and biology facts about native wasps illustrating their nesting habitat, prey specificity, and the ecosystem services they provide – pest insect population control and pollination.

This program is supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

For more information: https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant Workshop

This workshop will introduce prospective applicants to the Community Project Grant application and provide information about how to submit a competitive proposal.

Topics covered will include:

  • An overview of New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grants
  • Community Project Grant requirements
  • How a proposal is evaluated by NHH
  • How to complete the CPG Application and tips for crafting a compelling project narrative.
  • How to complete the Budget Template and meet the matching fund requirements.

 

Register 

NH History Institute

NH History Institute

Learn more about the state you love! The New Hampshire Historical Society presents the New Hampshire History Institute for upper elementary educators, a special three-day workshop running from August 2-4. This boot camp in New Hampshire history will include sessions on the Abenaki, early colonial settlement, American Revolution, tourism, immigration, and civics; age-appropriate social studies and ELA methodology; and an introduction to "Moose on the Loose: Social Studies for Granite State Kids," the new state social studies curriculum for upper elementary grades created by the New Hampshire Historical Society.

"Moose on the Loose" integrates high-quality social studies instruction with English language arts, math, and science requirements.

Register

This project is funded in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

This three-day workshop runs from August 2-4

NH History Institute (Virtual)

NH History Institute (Virtual)

Learn more about the state you love! The New Hampshire Historical Society presents the New Hampshire History Institute for upper elementary educators, a special three-day virtual workshop running from August 9-11. This boot camp in New Hampshire history will include sessions on the Abenaki, early colonial settlement, American Revolution, tourism, immigration, and civics; age-appropriate social studies and ELA methodology; and an introduction to "Moose on the Loose: Social Studies for Granite State Kids," the new state social studies curriculum for upper elementary grades created by the New Hampshire Historical Society.

"Moose on the Loose" integrates high-quality social studies instruction with English language arts, math, and science requirements.

Register

This project is funded in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

This three-day virtual workshop runs from August 9-11

NH Young Leaders Roundtable Discussion

NH Young Leaders Roundtable Discussion

Hear from young leaders such as the co-founder of the Black Lives Matter Manchester movement, a state representative, a school board member, a campaign manager, and a legislation tracker, who have taken actions such as planning walk-outs, organizing rallies, holding public office, speaking before the NH legislature and more. Please join us for this nonpartisan public discussion featuring five community leaders.

Register

On Shaky Ground: Students of Color in Predominantly White Institutions

For many students of color, being in an environment in which most of the people are different from themselves is a challenging experience. Students of color who are not able to feel connected to and a part of the university may feel alienated, inadequate, and depressed. Many experience pressure to adopt the values, beliefs, and attitudes of the dominant white culture while simultaneously feeling pressure to abandon their own culture.

Hear from a group of young New Hampshire students as they identify some of the social pressures they experience while attending a white educational institution, and ways in which they navigate campus environments to achieve self-realization and achieve academic success while creating a sense of belonging.

Presenters: Rekha Mahadevan, Berwick Academy Class of 2023; Grace Morelli, University of New Hampshire Class of 2021; Curtis Linton, University of New Hampshire Class of 2021, Mechanical Engineer; Ken Holmes, Senior Vice Provost for Student Life, University of New Hampshire

Moderator: Jada Hebra, Senior Vice President & Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer, Southern NH University


The winter Tea Talk series, presented by the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire (BHTNH) and sponsored in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities, is a series of participatory lectures related to New Hampshire’s Black history and African American culture. These events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.blackheritagetrailnh.org/tea-talks.

Register

Pollinators 101

Presented by Vicki J. Brown, natural resource steward and founding organizer of Pollinator Pathways NH

Who are "the pollinators"? Learn about the most common types of wild pollinators, their vital ecological role, and how we can profoundly impact the diversity of pollinators in our own yards and communities.

This program is supported in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

For more information: https://www.nhaudubon.org/education/exploring-connections-series/

Race & Care of the Soul

Race & Care of the Soul

Until the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer in 2020, few questioned the brutal hand of racism as orchestrated through police forces, our legal system, schools, workplaces and other institutions. The ensuing mass protests across the U.S. forced us to see the actual consequences of racism in a new light.

In a conversation with author Thomas Moore, participants will explore the effect of racism on our collective and individual Soul. Basing his writing on the ancient model of “care of the soul"—which provided a religious context for viewing the events of everyday life—Moore examines the connections between spirituality and the problems of individuals. He offers a therapeutic lifestyle that focuses on sacredness in ordinary things. Now, more than ever, we need to pause―intentionally―and encounter the Divine.


Presenters: Thomas Moore, author, Care of the Soul; Reginald Wilburn, Department of English, University of New Hampshire

Moderator: Rev. Lauren Smith, Director of Stewardship and Development, Unitarian Universalist Association


The winter Tea Talk series, presented by the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire (BHTNH) and sponsored in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities, is a series of participatory lectures related to New Hampshire’s Black history and African American culture. These events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.blackheritagetrailnh.org/tea-talks.

Register

Racism, Land & The American Farming Landscape

Racism, Land & The American Farming Landscape

In 1920, there were 949,889 Black farmers. A century later, according to the 2017 Census of Agriculture, only 35,470 remained.

This panel will investigate the contributing factors to this enormous land loss including discriminatory practices, such as the denial of USDA loans. and slow handling of civil rights complaints. Presenters will also share the innovative ways Black New England Farmers are reclaiming the land and sowing the seeds of health and empowerment.

Presenters: Reginald Jackson, Emeritus Professor of Communications at Simmons College, MA; Lydia Clemmons, President of Clemmons Family Farm, VT; Jarrad Nwameme 

Moderator: Meghan Howey, Professor in Anthropology, University of New Hampshire 


The winter Tea Talk series, presented by the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire (BHTNH) and sponsored in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities, is a series of participatory lectures related to New Hampshire’s Black history and African American culture. These events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://blackheritagetrailnh.org/tea-talks.

Register

The Celebration of Cultural Connections

The Celebration of Cultural Connections

The Celebration of Cultural Connections is part of Tammi J. Truax’s Poet Laureate project, Building Bridges through Poetry, designed to engage the community in a study of Japanese culture and poetry. At the celebration, the winners of Truax’s poetry broadside contest will be revealed, along with a new digital gallery; the audience will then enjoy a presentation by Monica Chiu, UNH Professor of English, specializing in Asian American studies, who will address questions regarding the intersection of art and poetry, as well as cross-cultural sharing. We hope this event will be attended by people from as far away as Japan.

Please email info@pplp.org for the Zoom invite to attend.

The History of the Great New England Hurricane as Documented by the People

The History of the Great New England Hurricane as Documented by the People

The Great New England Hurricane of 1938 is the most devastating tropical cyclone of all time to affect the region. Only two other comparable storms have been documented before or since. The effects of the storm were all encompassing and affected the entire region and its surroundings, and those that experienced it found many ways to document it (scrapbooks, photographic collections, objects made with fallen wood, songs, poems, fictional stories, as well as a massive number of historical accounts, and technical reports. Dr. Lourdes Avilés has been studying the storm for more than ten years and published a book on its science and history that weaves an interdisciplinary account of the storm and its effects. During that time, she has collected many artifacts, stories, and other pieces of interest that she will be sharing during her talk. She will also put the storm in the context of previous New England Hurricanes and what climate change means for such storms. www.takenbystorm1938.com

Dr. Lourdes Avilés, a Trustee of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, is Professor of Meteorology at Plymouth State University.

This program is part of the Community Project Grants-funded series, "Weather-Wise: Historical Records, Contemporary Conversations." For more information, please visit www.shakermuseum.org.

The Howling Storm: Weather, Climate, and the American Civil War

Dr. Kenneth W. Noe explores how the Civil War's unusual weather affected both the battlefield and the home front. Traditional histories describe the conflict as a war between North and South. Dr. Noe suggests it should instead be understood as a war between the North, the South, and the weather. He retells the history of the conflagration with a focus on the ways in which weather and climate shaped the outcomes of battles and campaigns. Events such as floods and droughts affecting the Confederate homefront constricted soldiers’ food supply, lowered morale, and undercut the government’s efforts to boost nationalist sentiment. By contrast, the superior equipment and open supply lines enjoyed by Union soldiers enabled them to cope successfully with the South’s extreme conditions and, ultimately, secure victory in 1865.

Kenneth W. Noe is the Draughon Professor of Southern History at Auburn University.

This program is part of the Community Project Grants-funded series, "Weather-Wise: Historical Records, Contemporary Conversations." For more information, please visit www.shakermuseum.org.

 

Wayfinding: Maps of the White Mountains

Wayfinding: Maps of the White Mountains

Join the Museum of the White Mountains for a lecture on the Emerging LiDAR Landscape, the first lecture in their Summer Speaker Series, Wayfinding: Maps of the White Mountains. Rick Chormann, State Geologist and Director of the NH Geological Survey, will introduce participants to LiDAR technology and its potential to revolutionize geologic mapping and digital terrain analysis; discuss the history of behind New Hampshire’s many stone walls; and introduce the NH Stone Wall Mapping project.

Register

This project is funded in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

William W. Treat Lecture Series 2: A Polarized Country - Can Schools Help Bridge the Divide?

William W. Treat Lecture Series 2: A Polarized Country - Can Schools Help Bridge the Divide?

How can schools in New Hampshire and nationally navigate polarization and inequity to help heal our country’s division? How can schools support civic participation and democracy? Join two thought leaders, Dianna Gahlsdorf Terrell of Saint Anselm College and Peter Levine of Tufts University in this interactive conversation and learn about current efforts and research.

Register

This project is funded in part by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.

Writing While Black: The Afrofuturistic Writer

Writing While Black: The Afrofuturistic Writer

In recent years, there has been an uptick, if not an actual surge, of works by science fiction writers of color, a literary genre where Black voices and characters have been historically absent. For writers of color the distinction between science fiction and fantasy, two imaginative genres is often blurred. Why? Because access to the scientific knowledge from which science fiction often is derived has been denied to people of the African diaspora for much of history. And the classification of what is and is not scientific is frequently a matter of dispute and Eurocentric. This panel will explore Black writers and characters in a genre where they have not been expected to excel.

Presenters: Sheree Renée Thomas, author; Nisi Shawl, author

Moderator: Dennis Britton, Ph.D., Department of English, University of New Hampshire

The winter Tea Talk series, presented by the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire (BHTNH) and sponsored in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities, is a series of participatory lectures related to New Hampshire’s Black history and African American culture. These events are free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.blackheritagetrailnh.org/tea-talks.

Register

Back to Community Project Grants Details

Community Project Grants Events
Wayfinding: Maps of the White Mountains
Virtual
Thursday, June 24, 2021
Plymouth, NH
Wayfinding: Maps of the White Mountains
Beecology: A Community Scientist Helping Pollinators
Virtual
Tuesday, July 20, 2021
Concord, NH
Beecology: A Community Scientist Helping Pollinators
NH History Institute
Monday, August 2, 2021
Concord, NH
NH History Institute
Archaeology at The Fells
Wednesday, August 4, 2021
Newbury, NH
Archaeology at The Fells
Civics Teachers Workshop
Thursday, August 5, 2021
Concord, NH
Civics Teachers Workshop
NH History Institute (Virtual)
Virtual
Monday, August 9, 2021
Concord, NH
NH History Institute (Virtual)
Civics Teachers Workshop (Virtual)
Virtual
Thursday, August 12, 2021
Concord, NH
Civics Teachers Workshop (Virtual)

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