Welcome!

All the events listed in this calendar are funded in whole or part by New Hampshire Humanities. All are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. Many of these events are Humanities to Go programs your organization can book, made possible in part by generous support from

 


View a PDF of our MAY Calendar here.
(To view previous editions of the Calendar, click here.)

Our Humanities to Go Catalog is available online! Click here to view it as a flip book, or click here for PDF.

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Manchester City Library | Manchester, NH

For those who yearn for peace in the Middle East but don’t believe it will happen in their lifetimes, Palestinian Osama Elewat and Israeli Netta Hazan offer an alternative vision. They’re coming to New Hampshire May 1-3 to demonstrate that peace is possible in our lifetimes and to model what it looks like. Ex-fighters from opposite sides of the conflict formed Combatants for Peace, a grass-roots organization founded on the conviction that the cycle of violence will only end when Israelis and Palestinians join forces to support peace and security for both sides.

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Unitarian Universalist Church of Concord | Concord, NH

For those who yearn for peace in the Middle East but don’t believe it will happen in their lifetimes, Palestinian Osama Elewat and Israeli Netta Hazan offer an alternative vision. They’re coming to New Hampshire May 1-3 to demonstrate that peace is possible in our lifetimes and to model what it looks like.

Kensington Public Library | Kensington, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Philip Read Memorial Library | Plainfield, NH

The largest river in New England rises in a small beaver pond near the Canadian border and flows over 400 miles through four states, falling 2,670 feet to the sea through America's only watershed-based national fish and wildlife refuge. Adair Mulligan leads an armchair tour of this great river in New Hampshire and Vermont, exploring its history and natural beauty through the seasons and among the communities that have sprung up along its banks. Next, the discussion will shift to how the river has influenced the lives of those who live there, and how they, in turn, have affected the river.

First Baptist Church | Plaistow, NH

Deborah Anne Goss appears as Abby Hutchinson Patton, recalling mid-19th-century U.S. and New Hampshire history and performing rousing anthems, heartfelt ballads, and humorous ditties sung during anti-slavery and early women's rights struggles. In the 1840s and 1850s the Hutchinson Family Singers strongly influenced the opinions of the era with their popular songs promoting healthy living and social justice-most prominently the abolition of slavery. Participants are encouraged to join in the singing on several choruses or read a poem or political diatribe of the time.

Thursday, May 3, 2018

Goodwin Library | Farmington, NH

The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry.

Portsmouth Public Library | Portsmouth, NH

For those who yearn for peace in the Middle East but don’t believe it will happen in their lifetimes, Palestinian Osama Elewat and Israeli Netta Hazan offer an alternative vision. They’re coming to New Hampshire May 1-3 to demonstrate that peace is possible in our lifetimes and to model what it looks like. Ex-fighters from opposite sides of the conflict formed Combatants for Peace, a grass-roots organization founded on the conviction that the cyle of violence will only end when Israelis and Palestinians join forces to promote peace and security for both sides.

Conway Public Library | Conway, NH

Oney Judge Staines, according to the Constitution, was only three-fifths of a person. To her masters, George and Martha Washington, she was merely "the girl." All she wanted was the freedom to control her own actions, but her account of escaping the Executive Mansion in Philadelphia, fleeing north and establishing a life in New Hampshire is not a typical runaway story.

Jaffrey Public Library | Jaffrey, NH

One hundred years ago, a full generation before Rosie the Riveter, American women rolled up their sleeves and entered war industries where they had never been welcome before. They ran powerful machinery, learned new skills, and faced the sullen hostility of the men in the shops. In this illustrated lecture, historian Carrie Brown reveals their courage and their hard work, asks what impact "the Great War" had on their lives, and explores how these women helped shape the work that their more famous daughters would do in the next World War. 

NH Theatre Project WEST | Portsmouth, NH

So much that needs healing in our world... why are we uncomfortable talking about it? New Hampshire Theatre Project has launched a provocative series featuring four plays about subjects that we as a society often have difficulty discussing: abuse and human trafficking, mental illness, the opioid crisis, and death and dying. Each event is moderated by Timothy Barretto, known for his UNH courses on Managing Conflict in the Community, who will facilitate discussion among audience members, artists, and a panel of experts on the topic.

Sunday, May 6, 2018

Ray-Fre Senior Center | Raymond, NH

New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities.  Using photographs of the few surviving "mint condition" meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.  

Plains School | Portsmouth, NH

The music we listen to every day says a lot about us and about our society-and so it was with our Victorian forebears. Their favorite songs reveal much about their inner lives while also reflecting developments in the culture at large. Marya Danihel discusses and performs songs middle-class Victorians sang for pleasure at home in New England, further illustrating her social and music history with 19th-century artwork and memoirs. Melodious, witty, and touching, this music includes parlor songs, Civil War songs, and selections by Stephen Foster and his contemporaries.

Monday, May 7, 2018

Lions Club Hall | Moultonborough, NH

In 1837, teenaged Victoria ascended to the British throne, untrained and innocent. Those who would try to usurp her power underestimated this self-willed intelligent young woman whose mettle sustained her through her 63-year reign. Using Queen Victoria's diary and letters, this program reveals the personal details of a powerful yet humane woman, who took seriously her role as monarch in a time of great expansion. She and her husband, Albert, set an example of high moral character and dedication, a novelty in the royal house after generations of scandal.

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Elkins Public Library | Canterbury, NH

In January 2016, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association announced the discovery of the wreckage of two sunken whale ships off the Alaskan coast. Oil, Ice, and Bone tells the story of these vessels and how they came to be lost in the greatest whaling disaster in American history. Arctic whaler Nathaniel Ransom served as third mate of one of the ships abandoned in 1871. In 1860, as a fourteen-year-old, he followed his five older brothers into the dank forecastle of a whaling vessel.

Cornish Meeting House | Cornish Flat, NH

Quilts tell stories, and quilt history is full of myths and misinformation as well as heart-warming tales of service and tradition. Nearly every world culture that has cold weather uses quilted textiles-quilting is NOT just an American art. Pam Weeks weaves world history, women's history, industrial history and just plain wonderful stories into her presentation. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification and/or story sharing.

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Rye Public Library | Rye, NH

Karolyn Kinane presents a lively, interactive crash course in the medieval English language, specifically the poetry of Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. Participants will have the opportunity to read and recite medieval poetry aloud in a fun, relaxed environment. The program includes a brief, illustrated historical overview of the events that sparked linguistic transitions from the Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman eras to the Middle English era, including the Norman Invasion, the Black Death, and the invention of the printing press.

Aaron Cutler Memorial Library | Litchfield, NH

This program offers a fun and engaging look at the historic and unusual weathervanes found on New Hampshire's churches, town halls, and other public buildings from earliest times down to the present. Highlighted by the visual presentation of a sampling of the vanes found throughout the state, Glenn Knoblock's program will trace the history of weathervanes, their practical use and interesting symbolism, as well as their varied types and methods of manufacture and evolution from practical weather instrument to architectural embellishment.

Parish of the Transfiguration Parish Hall | Manchester, NH

Manchester is one example of the many industrial cities that attracted immigrants from Quebec in numbers large enough to warrant the creation and maintenance of an infrastructure of religious, educational, social, cultural, and commercial institutions that helped preserve this community's language and traditions. Robert Perreault shares stories about life in one of America's major Franco-American centers.

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Rye Congregational Church | Rye, NH

The year is 1876, and New Hampshire's own John Hutchinson sings and tells about his famous musical family "straight from the horse's mouth."  Originally from Milford, NH, the Hutchinson Family Singers were among America's most notable musical entertainers for much of the mid-19th century. They achieved international recognition with songs advancing social reform and political causes such as abolition, temperance, women's suffrage, and the Lincoln presidential campaign of 1860. In this living history program, Steve Blunt portrays John Hutchinson.

Seabrook Library | Seabrook, NH

The foundation of Western civilization rests on three monotheistic faiths - Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The interaction between and among these systems of belief continues to impact events in daily life and politics on the world stage. Following an outline of Islamic beliefs and practices by Charles Kennedy, discussion turns to how Islam is practiced in the United States.  

 

Brookline Public Library | Brookline, NH

Telling personal and family stories is fun - and much more. Storytelling connects strangers, strengthens links between generations, and gives children the self-knowledge to carry them through hard times. Knowledge of family history has even been linked to better teen behavior and mental health. In this active and interactive program, storyteller Jo Radner shares foolproof ways to mine memories and interview relatives for meaningful stories. Participants practices finding, developing, and telling their own tales.

Kimball Library | Atkinson, NH

On a frontier where individualism flourished, New Hampshire's consummate woodsman was just the leader to bring his men back safely from deep in dangerous country, even in stormy, freezing weather. "The famous Major Rogers" renown was such that he became perhaps the single-best-known American on both sides of the Atlantic. In October 1765, a private audience with young King George III led, eleven months later, to the launching of an expedition to find the long-dreamed-of Northwest passage to the Pacific - forty years before Lewis and Clark.

Rochester Historical Society Museum | Rochester, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.  Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place.  She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. 

Dover Adult Learning Center, McConnell Center | Dover, NH

Woody Pringle and Marek Bennett present an overview of the American Civil War through the lens of period music. Audience members participate and sing along as the presenters explore lyrics, documents, and visual images from sources such as the Library of Congress. Through camp songs, parlor music, hymns, battlefield rallying cries, and fiddle tunes, Pringle and Bennett examine the folksong as a means to enact living history, share perspectives, influence public perceptions of events, and simultaneously fuse and conserve cultures in times of change.

Saturday, May 12, 2018

Grafton Town Hall | Grafton, NH

THIS PROGRAM HAS BEEN POSTPONED. A NEW DATE HAS YET TO BE DETERMINED.

 

 

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Goffstown Public Library | Goffstown, NH

John Gfroerer explores the power of television as a communication medium and the ethical implications of manipulating the viewer by means of the choices made behind the camera through the final editing process. By examining the artistic techniques used to persuade, induce, and entice us, Gfroerer considers the extent to which television teaches or simply tantalizes us. Are ethical boundaries crossed by the use of these techniques, and to what extent as media consumers should we care?

Littleton Public Library | Littleton, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Corner Meeting House | Belmont, NH

Everyone knows that there's "something about lighthouses" that gives them broad appeal, but their vital role in our history and culture is little appreciated. Our early nation was built on maritime economy, and lighthouses were part of the system that made that possible. Due to automation, traditional lighthouse keeping is a way of life that has faded into the past. Jeremy D'Entremont tells the history of New England's historic and picturesque lighthouses primarily focusing on the colorful and dramatic stories of lighthouse keepers and their families.

John O'Leary Adult Community Center | Merrimack, NH

Michael Tougias takes the audience on a historic journey as the Colonists and Native Americans fought for control of New England from the Pilgrims' first arrival to the closing days of the French and Indian Wars. Using slides of maps, battle sites, roadside history, and period drawings, Tougias covers the Pequot War, King Philip's War, and the French and Indian Wars.  Strategies of the Natives and Colonial raids are all featured. These include Rogers Rangers' raid on the St.

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Folsom Tavern | Exeter, NH

Lucie Therrien follows the migration of French-Canadians and the evolution of their traditional music:  its arrival in North America from France; the music's crossing with Indian culture during the evangelization of Acadia and Quebec; its growth alongside English culture after British colonization; and its expansion from Quebec to New England, as well as from Acadia to Louisiana. 

First Congregational Church Fellowship Hall | Hampton, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.  Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place.  She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. THIS PROGRAM IS A PROGRAM THAT WAS POSTPONED FROM MARCH 8TH. 

Chamberlin Free Public Library | Greenville, NH

New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities.  Using photographs of the few surviving "mint condition" meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.  

Joseph Patch Library | Warren, NH

The Appalachian Mountain Club's Hut System is a unique institution in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Allen Koop explores how the huts and the people who built, maintain and use them have formed a world apart, a mountain society with its own history, traditions, and legends.  

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Chesterfield Town Hall | Chesterfield, NH

Everyone knows that there's "something about lighthouses" that gives them broad appeal, but their vital role in our history and culture is little appreciated. Our early nation was built on maritime economy, and lighthouses were part of the system that made that possible. Due to automation, traditional lighthouse keeping is a way of life that has faded into the past. Jeremy D'Entremont tells the history of New England's historic and picturesque lighthouses primarily focusing on the colorful and dramatic stories of lighthouse keepers and their families.

Stephenson Memorial Library Wensberg Room | Greenfield, NH

From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history.

Lawrence Barn | Hollis, NH

The Hardtacks (Marek Bennett and Woody Pringle) deliver an engaging overview of global politics prior to the American Civil War through the lens of early banjo music. Between 1820 and 1860, the banjo transformed from a slave instrument found only on Southern plantations to an international pop phenomenon: songs and playing techniques carried far and wide in the emerging global economy, from the streets of New York's Five Points slum to the gold fields of California and the elite drawing rooms of London, from the battlegrounds of Nicaragua to official diplomatic receptions in Japan.

Friday, May 18, 2018

Curious George Cottage | Waterville Valley, NH

The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry.

Effingham Historical Society | Effingham, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Wilton Public Library | Wilton, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

 

Goshen Town Hall | Goshen, NH

Over the centuries immigrants from the British Isles have come to the Americas bringing with them their musical styles and tastes as well as their instruments. With the concertina, bodhran, mandolin, octave mandolin, guitar, and banjo, Emery Hutchins and Jim Prendergast sing and play this traditional Celtic music, but they also perform American country music in the way it was conceived in the early twentieth century.

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Deerfield Town Hall | Deerfield, NH

Quilts tell stories, and quilt history is full of myths and misinformation as well as heart-warming tales of service and tradition. Nearly every world culture that has cold weather uses quilted textiles-quilting is NOT just an American art. Pam Weeks weaves world history, women's history, industrial history and just plain wonderful stories into her presentation. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification and/or story sharing.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Merrimack Public Library | Merrimack, NH

Manchester is one example of the many industrial cities that attracted immigrants from Quebec in numbers large enough to warrant the creation and maintenance of an infrastructure of religious, educational, social, cultural, and commercial institutions that helped preserve this community's language and traditions. Robert Perreault shares stories about life in one of America's major Franco-American centers.

Madison Library | Madison, NH

During World War II, 300 German prisoners of war were held at Camp Stark near the village of Stark in New Hampshire's North Country. Allen Koop reveals the history of this camp, which tells us much about our country's war experience and about our state.  

Court Street Arts Alumni Hall | Haverhill, NH

Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Weeks Public Library | Greenland, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.

Wadleigh Memorial Library | Milford, NH

The ancient Greek philosophers defined eudaimonia as living a full and excellent life. In this illustrated talk, Maria Sanders explores how ideas of happiness have changed in Western civilization through the ages, while comparing and contrasting major concepts of well-being throughout the world. Can money buy happiness? To what extent does engaging in one's community impact happiness? When worldwide surveys of happiness are conducted, why doesn't the United States make the top ten?

Currier Museum of Art | Manchester, NH

New Hampshire Humanities and the Currier Museum of Art invite you to a special program featuring the work of veterans who participated in the "To Tell What They Can't Say" March workshop led by Pulitzer Prize-winning war correspondent David Wood and international photo journalist Andrea Bruce.

Bradford Community Center Youth Room | Bradford, NH

This program offers a fun and engaging look at the historic and unusual weathervanes found on New Hampshire's churches, town halls, and other public buildings from earliest times down to the present. Highlighted by the visual presentation of a sampling of the vanes found throughout the state, Glenn Knoblock's program will trace the history of weathervanes, their practical use and interesting symbolism, as well as their varied types and methods of manufacture and evolution from practical weather instrument to architectural embellishment.

Stephenson Memorial Library | Greenfield, NH

In January 2016, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association announced the discovery of the wreckage of two sunken whale ships off the Alaskan coast. Oil, Ice, and Bone tells the story of these vessels and how they came to be lost in the greatest whaling disaster in American history. Arctic whaler Nathaniel Ransom served as third mate of one of the ships abandoned in 1871. In 1860, as a fourteen-year-old, he followed his five older brothers into the dank forecastle of a whaling vessel.

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Tad's Place Cultural Arts Center at Heritage Heights | Concord, NH

Living historian Sally Mummey portrays Mary Todd Lincoln as she muses on her life from her dreams as a girl to her years as First Lady during the Civil War. Mrs. Lincoln shares stories of her life with President Lincoln and the events of that evening in Ford's Theatre when the assassin's bullet not only changed the course of the nation but destroyed her life as well. From the opulence of the White House to the dregs of obscurity, Mrs.

Center Harbor Village Schoolhouse | Center Harbor, NH

Post cards have many a story to tell about the built landscape, disastrous events such as fires or floods, daily folk customs, and the identity of place. During the golden age of the post card, before telephones, personal messages could contain anything from the mundane, "Having a fine time, wish you were here..." to more profound reflections on family life or colorful portraits of towns and cities from the perspective of newly-landed immigrants.

Pierce Manse | Concord, NH

In the early 20th century, the New Hampshire Board of Agriculture launched a program to boost the rural economy and promote tourism through the sale of abandoned farms to summer residents. After introducing the country house movement, Cristina Ashjian focuses attention on some of the great country estates featured in the New Hampshire program between 1902 and 1913. Which private estates were recognized as exemplary, and who were their owners?

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Bath Public Library | Bath, NH

From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history.

Monday, May 28, 2018

Groton Town House | Groton , NH

New Hampshire towns did not erect monuments to prior wars, but the emotional and family toll, unprecedented in American history, drove the decision to honor our local soldiers and sailors of the War of Rebellion. From Seabrook to Colebrook, Berlin to Hinsdale, along Main Streets and 19th-century dirt roads, in city parks and on town greens, in libraries and town halls, and in cemeteries prominent and obscure, George Morrison located, inventoried, and photographed the fascinating variety of New Hampshire's Civil War memorials.

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Gilmanton Old Town Hall | Gilmanton Iron Works, NH

Quilts tell stories, and quilt history is full of myths and misinformation as well as heart-warming tales of service and tradition. Nearly every world culture that has cold weather uses quilted textiles-quilting is NOT just an American art. Pam Weeks weaves world history, women's history, industrial history and just plain wonderful stories into her presentation. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification and/or story sharing.

Thursday, May 31, 2018

Howe Library | Hanover, NH

Uprooted is a 30-minute documentary based on interviews collected during the Humanities Council's Fences & Neighbors initiative on immigration. It tells the story of five refugees who escaped from war-torn countries to resettle in New Hampshire. The film explores what it means to be a refugee and how it feels to make a new life in a strange place, often without English language skills, family, a job, or community contacts. The film leaves us pondering questions of belonging and citizenship. What does it mean to be an American? Once a refugee, are you destined always to be a refugee?