All the events listed in this calendar are funded in whole or part by New Hampshire Humanities. All are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.

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Wednesday, May 4, 2016

New Hampshire Veterans Home | Tilton, NH

This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. Cottrell will be accompanied by his appropriately named Chinook, Tug.

First Baptist Church | Plaistow, NH

Over the centuries immigrants from the British Isles have come to the Americas bringing with them their musical styles and tastes as well as their instruments. With the concertina, bodhran, mandolin, octave mandolin, guitar, and banjo, Emery Hutchins and Jim Prendergast sing and play this traditional Celtic music, but they also perform American country music in the way it was conceived in the early twentieth century.

Saturday, May 7, 2016

Silsby Free Public Library | Charlestown, NH

This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. Cottrell will be accompanied by his appropriately named Chinook, Tug.

Sunday, May 8, 2016

Wilmot Community Association Red Barn | Wilmot, NH

Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go "underground," concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution. Robert Goodby reveals archaeological evidence that shows their deep presence here, inches below the earth's surface.  

Monday, May 9, 2016

Amherst Public Library | Amherst, NH

Speaking as Betsey Phelps, the mother of a Union soldier from Amherst, New Hampshire who died heroically at the Battle of Gettysburg, Sharon Wood offers an informative and sensitive reflection on that sacrifice from a mother's perspective.  Wood blends the Phelps boy's story with those of other men who left their New Hampshire homes to fight for the Union cause and of the families who supported them on the home front.  

 

Cornish Town Office (Upstairs) | Cornish, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

 

Moultonborough Public Library | Moultonborough, NH

From Seabrook to Colebrook, Berlin to Hinsdale, New Hampshire's towns, individuals and veterans organizations erected a fascinating assortment of memorials to The War of the Rebellion.  Beginning with obelisks of the 1860s and continuing to re-mastered works of the 21st century, historian George Morrison presents a diverse selection of New Hampshire's commemorations. THIS MEETING WILL BE HELD IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE MONTHLY MEETING OF THE MOULTONBOROUGH HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

 

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

The Pierce Manse | Concord , NH

New Hampshire has lost many of its important historic buildings to fire, neglect, intentional demolition and re-development.  In some cases, a plaque or marker provides a physical reminder of what was, but in other examples, no tangible evidence remains.

Lawrence Barn | Hollis, NH

Did you know that photographer Margaret Bourke-White had to make Stalin laugh to get his picture, and she was told by Patton to hide his jowls? Letters and tender WWII-era V-mails found at Syracuse University form the basis for this living history program. Sally Matson's lifetime in theatre began with acting and directing at Northwestern University, and her fascination with history provides the audience with an entertaining lesson.  

Maxfield Public Library | Loudon, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Elkins Public Library | Canterbury, NH

Marek Bennett presents a whirlwind survey of comics from around the world and throughout history, with special attention to what these vibrant narratives tell (and show) us about the people and periods that created them. Bennett engages and involves the audience in an interactive discussion of several sample comics representing cultures such as Ancient Rome, Medieval Europe, the Ancient Maya, Feudal and modern Japan, the United States in the early 20th century, and Nazi Germany during World War II.

Madbury Town Hall | Madbury, NH

When was the War of 1812? That's a trick question, but if you don't recall America's "Forgotten War" with England , you are not alone. Two hundred years ago, with only 17 armed ships, a youthful United States declared war on the world's largest navy (over, 1,000 warships). Then we invaded Canada. That didn't go well. In retaliation the British burned Washington, DC to the ground. So how come we think we won? J. Dennis Robinson offers an upbeat, often irreverent, slideshow on New Hampshire's reluctant role in "Mr.

Dunbar Free Library | Grantham, NH

The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry.

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Hollis Social Library | Hollis, NH

Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go "underground," concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution. Robert Goodby reveals archaeological evidence that shows their deep presence here, inches below the earth's surface.  

 

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Wiggin Memorial Library | Stratham, NH

The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry.

Brookline Public Library | Brookline, NH

John G. Winant, three-time governor of New Hampshire went on to serve the nation in several capacities on the national and international scene. In the process he became a hero to the British in World War Two and to the common man throughout the developed world. His life, marked by highs and lows, ended tragically in his mansion in Concord.  The program examines his life and measures his impact at home and abroad.

 

Seabrook Library | Seabrook, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.  Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place.  She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. 

Wolfeboro Public Library | Wolfeboro, NH

This lecture provides a view of Afghanistan and the surrounding region through visual images and the stories of individuals who live there. Throughout the presentation Rachel Lehr will illustrate how ordinary lives and people are impacted by international politics and economics. Their personal experiences and research expertise afford a rare view of this misunderstood and complex region. 

Lane Tavern | Sanbornton, NH

In their more than two and a half centuries of existence, members of the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, commonly known as Shakers, made ingenious contributions to diverse fields: agriculture, industry, medicine, music, furniture design, women's rights, racial equality, craftsmanship, social and religious thought, and mechanical invention and improvement.  Darryl Thompson explores some of these contributions in his lecture and shares some of his personal memories of the Canterbury Shakers.

Community Church of New Boston | New Boston, NH

The first agricultural fair in North America was held in what is now Londonderry in 1722, and it would become a wildly popular event lasting for generations until it came to be so dominated by gambling, flim-flam, and other "scandalous dimensions" that the legislature revoked its charter in 1850. But fairs have always had strong supporters and eventually the state came around to appropriating modest sums to help them succeed. Temperance groups and others would continue to attack the fairs on moral grounds and their close connection to horse racing was a chronic flashpoint.

Friday, May 13, 2016

Harvey Mitchell Memorial Library | Epping, NH

Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the "Gettysburg Address." Along the way he comments on the debates with Stephen Douglas, his run for the presidency, and the Civil War.  

Saturday, May 14, 2016

Kingston Community Library | Kingston, NH
Storytelling connects strangers, strengthens links between generations, and gives children the self-knowledge to carry them through hard times.  Collecting community stories helps create connections, preserve history, and foster a deeper understanding of the town or city’s collective roots, current challenges, and hopes for the future.
 

Monday, May 16, 2016

North Hampton Town Hall | North Hampton, NH

In a brief 30-year period in the early 19th century the New Hampshire countryside became home to hundreds of thousands of sheep. Production of wool became a lucrative business, generating fortunes and providing the only time of true agricultural prosperity in the state's history. It left behind a legacy of fine architecture and thousands of miles of rugged stonewalls. Steve Taylor discusses how farmers overcame enormous challenges to make sheep husbandry succeed, but forces from beyond New Hampshire were to doom the industry, with social consequences that would last a century. 

J.A. Tarbell Library | Lyndeborough, NH

The year is 1876, and New Hampshire's own John Hutchinson sings and tells about his famous musical family "straight from the horse's mouth."  Originally from Milford, NH, the Hutchinson Family Singers were among America's most notable musical entertainers for much of the mid-19th century. They achieved international recognition with songs advancing social reform and political causes such as abolition, temperance, women's suffrage, and the Lincoln presidential campaign of 1860. In this living history program, Steve Blunt portrays John Hutchinson.

Campton Historical Society | Campton, NH

"All Aboard the Titanic" responds to people's enduring fascination with this historic, and very human, event.  Including and moving beyond the physical facts of the story, Ted Zalewski explores the personal experiences of selected passengers and crew, including those with New Hampshire affiliations, emphasizing examples of individual courage and triumph.

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Gilman Library | Alton, NH

In 1837, teenaged Victoria ascended to the British throne, untrained and innocent. Those who would try to usurp her power underestimated this self-willed intelligent young woman whose mettle sustained her through her 63-year reign. Using Queen Victoria's diary and letters, this program reveals the personal details of a powerful yet humane woman, who took seriously her role as monarch in a time of great expansion. She and her husband, Albert, set an example of high moral character and dedication, a novelty in the royal house after generations of scandal.

Dover Adult Learning Center - McConnell Center | Dover, NH

Daily life for the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company's textile worker was not easy. Robert Perreault sheds light on how people from a variety of European countries as well as from French Canada made the transition from an agrarian to an industrial society and how that change affected families, cultures, the nature of work, and relationships among workers themselves.

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

St. Marks Church - Sherrill Hall | Ashland, NH

Over the centuries immigrants from the British Isles have come to the Americas bringing with them their musical styles and tastes as well as their instruments. With the concertina, bodhran, mandolin, octave mandolin, guitar, and banjo, Emery Hutchins and Jim Prendergast sing and play this traditional Celtic music, but they also perform American country music in the way it was conceived in the early twentieth century.

Litchfield Community Church | Litchfield, NH

Jose Lezcano presents a multi-media musical program that showcases the guitar in Latin America as an instrument that speaks many languages. Lezcano presents a variety of musical styles: indigenous strummers in ritual festivals from Ecuador, Gaucho music from Argentina, European parlor waltzes from Venezuela, and Afro-Brazilian samba-pagode. He also plays pieces by Villa-Lobos, Brouwer, Lauro, Barrios, Pereira, and examples from his Fulbright-funded research in Ecuador. 

Bedford Public Library | Bedford, NH

Based on recently discovered historical materials and recent books, this program by Douglas Wheeler is an inquiry into the life and death of America's first spy, the patriot-martyr, Nathan Hale, of Coventry, Connecticut. Wheeler takes audiences on a journey through the spy world of the Culper Spy Ring of New York, Long Island and Connecticut, the most secret of the American spy rings and the most successful in getting useful intelligence to General George Washington beginning in 1778, two years after Hale's tragic execution by the British.

Thursday, May 19, 2016

Lawrence Barn | Hollis, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.  Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place.  She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. POTLUCK DINNER AND ANNUAL MEETING WILL BEGIN AT 7:00 PM WITH PROGRAM TO FOLLOW AT 8:00 PM.

Aaron Cutler Memorial Library | Litchfield, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Stephenson Memorial Library | Greenfield, NH

The first agricultural fair in North America was held in what is now Londonderry in 1722, and it would become a wildly popular event lasting for generations until it came to be so dominated by gambling, flim-flam, and other "scandalous dimensions" that the legislature revoked its charter in 1850. But fairs have always had strong supporters and eventually the state came around to appropriating modest sums to help them succeed. Temperance groups and others would continue to attack the fairs on moral grounds and their close connection to horse racing was a chronic flashpoint.

Millyard Museum | Manchester, NH

Teddy Roosevelt chose Portsmouth to be the site of the 1905 peace treaty negotiations between Russian and Japanese delegations to end the Russo-Japanese war. Charles Doleac's program first focuses on Roosevelt's multi-track diplomacy that included other world powers, the Russian and Japanese delegations, the US Navy, and New Hampshire hosts in 30 days of negotiations that resulted in the Portsmouth Peace Treaty and earned Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize. The program then focuses on how ordinary people from throughout New Hampshire positively affected the Portsmouth negotiations.

Grantham Town Hall | Grantham, NH

Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go "underground," concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution. Robert Goodby reveals archaeological evidence that shows their deep presence here, inches below the earth's surface.  PRESENTATION WILL BE PART OF HISTORICAL SOCIETY ANNUAL MEETING. POTLUCK DINNER BEGINS AT 6:00PM, AND A SHORT BUSINESS MEETING AT 6:45PM.

Laconia Public Library | Laconia, NH

The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry.

Woodstock Town Office Building | North Woodstock, NH

Musical humorist Charles Ross Taggart grew up in Topsham, Vermont, going on to perform in various lyceum and Chautauqua circuits all across the country for over 40 years starting in 1895.  A fiddler, piano player, comedian, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 40 recordings on various labels, as well as appearing in an early talking movie four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Adam Boyce portrays Mr. Taggart near the end of Taggart's career, c.

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Tin Shop | Bradford, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

 

Canaan Town Library | Canaan, NH

The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry.

Antrim Grange | Antrim, NH

The first agricultural fair in North America was held in what is now Londonderry in 1722, and it would become a wildly popular event lasting for generations until it came to be so dominated by gambling, flim-flam, and other "scandalous dimensions" that the legislature revoked its charter in 1850. But fairs have always had strong supporters and eventually the state came around to appropriating modest sums to help them succeed. Temperance groups and others would continue to attack the fairs on moral grounds and their close connection to horse racing was a chronic flashpoint.

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Meredith Public Library | Meredith, NH

From Seabrook to Colebrook, Berlin to Hinsdale, New Hampshire's towns, individuals and veterans organizations erected a fascinating assortment of memorials to The War of the Rebellion.  Beginning with obelisks of the 1860s and continuing to re-mastered works of the 21st century, historian George Morrison presents a diverse selection of New Hampshire's commemorations.

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Weeks Public Library | Greenland, NH

Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.

Kensington Public Library | Kensington, NH

Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.  

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Tad's Place Cultural Arts Center, Heritage Heights | Concord, NH

The native Abenaki people played a central role in the history of the Monadnock region, defending it against  English settlement and forcing the abandonment of Keene and other Monadnock area towns during the French and Indian Wars. Despite this, little is known about the Abenaki, and conventional histories often depict the first Europeans entering an untamed, uninhabited wilderness, rather than the homeland of people who had been there for hundreds of generations.

Upper Valley Senior Center | Lebanon, NH

Speaking as Betsey Phelps, the mother of a Union soldier from Amherst, New Hampshire who died heroically at the Battle of Gettysburg, Sharon Wood offers an informative and sensitive reflection on that sacrifice from a mother's perspective.  Wood blends the Phelps boy's story with those of other men who left their New Hampshire homes to fight for the Union cause and of the families who supported them on the home front.  

Saturday, May 28, 2016

Bath Town Hall | Bath, NH

Since the late 1600s, the lively tradition of contra dancing has kept people of all ages swinging and sashaying in barns, town halls, and schools around the state.  Contra dancing came to New Hampshire by way of the English colonists and remains popular in many communities, particularly in the Monadnock Region. Presenter Dudley Laufman brings this tradition to life with stories, poems and recordings of callers, musicians, and dancers, past and present. Live music, always integral to this dance form, will be played on the fiddle and melodeon.

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Minot-Sleeper Library | Bristol, NH

Anyone who ever posted a Gone Fishin' sign on the door during business hours will appreciate this native fisherman's glimpse into the habits, rituals, and lore of some of the more colorful members of the not-so-exclusive "Liars' Club." Hal Lyon shares tales, secrets, folklore, and history of fishing in New Hampshire's big lakes - especially Lake Winnipesaukee which translates into "Smile of the Great Spirit." 

 

Pembroke Town Library | Pembroke, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Friday, June 3, 2016

Walpole Town Hall | Walpole, NH

Exploring the legacy of the nineteenth century New England Transcendentalists, Pontine Theatre focuses on three influential Massachusetts communities: the circle of philosophers surrounding Ralph Waldo Emerson in Concord; Bronson Alcott's ill-fated utopian experiment at Fruitlands in Harvard; and the ambitious communal farm founded by George Ripley at Brook Farm in West Roxbury.

 

Goodwin Library | Farmington, NH

Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape.

Monday, June 6, 2016

Northfield Town Hall Basement | Northfield, NH

Living historian Sally Mummey portrays Mary Todd Lincoln as she muses on her life from her dreams as a girl to her years as First Lady during the Civil War. Mrs. Lincoln shares stories of her life with President Lincoln and the events of that evening in Ford's Theatre when the assassin's bullet not only changed the course of the nation but destroyed her life as well. From the opulence of the White House to the dregs of obscurity, Mrs. Lincoln lived out her life struggling with affliction and tragedy.

Gorham Public Library | Gorham, NH

Over the centuries immigrants from the British Isles have come to the Americas bringing with them their musical styles and tastes as well as their instruments. With the concertina, bodhran, mandolin, octave mandolin, guitar, and banjo, Emery Hutchins and Jim Prendergast sing and play this traditional Celtic music, but they also perform American country music in the way it was conceived in the early twentieth century.

Wolfeboro Community Center | Wolfeboro, NH

Neill DePaoli tells the story of former Indian captive John Gyles who became one of provincial Massachusetts' leading interpreters and a player in negotiations between the English and Indians of Maine and New Hampshire. Gyles was a "culture broker," parlaying his knowledge of his own and other cultures as Europeans and Native Americans struggled to bridge the cultural divide that separated them from one another.  

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Seabrook Library | Seabrook, NH

Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go "underground," concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution. Robert Goodby reveals archaeological evidence that shows their deep presence here, inches below the earth's surface.  

Rochester Historical Society Museum | Rochester, NH

Local legend says Strawbery Banke Museum began when a Portsmouth librarian gave a rousing speech in 1957. The backstory, however, is richly complex. This is a dramatic tale of economics, urban renewal, immigration, and historic architecture in New Hampshire's only seaport. J. Dennis Robinson, author of an award-winning "biography" of the 10-acre Strawbery Banke campus, shares the history of "America's oldest neighborhood." Tapping into private letters, unpublished records, and personal interviews, Robinson explores the politics of preservation.

Sunday, June 12, 2016

Hancock Meeting House | Hancock, NH

New Hampshire's Muster Day tradition ended in 1850, as did some of the related localized rivalries that involved the stealing of cannons.  Muster Day was a day of drills, marching, and sham battles for local militias in NH. This spectator event was accompanied by entertainers, vendors, gamblers, and a great deal of alcohol. Throughout 19th century NH, demand for cannons for Fourth of July, election celebrations, demonstrations of civic pride, and for the sheer cussedness of making noise, often exceeded supply.

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Wright Museum of World War II | Wolfeboro, NH

Did you know that photographer Margaret Bourke-White had to make Stalin laugh to get his picture, and she was told by Patton to hide his jowls? Letters and tender WWII-era V-mails found at Syracuse University form the basis for this living history program. Sally Matson's lifetime in theatre began with acting and directing at Northwestern University, and her fascination with history provides the audience with an entertaining lesson.  

 

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

White Church | Lisbon, NH

This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. Cottrell will be accompanied by his appropriately named Chinook, Tug.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Castle in the Clouds, Carriage House | Moultonborough, NH

In the early 20th Century, the New Hampshire Board of Agriculture launched a program to boost the rural economy and promote tourism through the sale of abandoned farms to summer residents. After introducing the country house movement, Cristina Ashjian focuses attention on some of the great country estates featured in the NH program between 1902 and 1913.  Which private estates were recognized as exemplary, and who were their owners?

Keene Public Library | Keene, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

East Andover Grange Hall | East Andover, NH

This talk by Jere Daniell comes in several forms. Among the most requested are "Popular Images of Small Town New England," "Novels Set in New England Towns," (Daniell distributes a list of his favorites), and simply "The New Hampshire Town." The last of these ends with a comparison of Granite State towns to other towns in New England. 

Wolfeboro Public Library | Wolfeboro, NH

Uprooted is a 30-minute documentary based on interviews collected during the Humanities Council's Fences & Neighbors initiative on immigration. It tells the story of five refugees who escaped from war-torn countries to resettle in New Hampshire. The film explores what it means to be a refugee and how it feels to make a new life in a strange place, often without English language skills, family, a job, or community contacts. The film leaves us pondering questions of belonging and citizenship. What does it mean to be an American? Once a refugee, are you destined always to be a refugee?

Friday, June 17, 2016

Barnstead Town Hall | Center Barnstead, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.  Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place.  She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. 

Saturday, June 18, 2016

Center Meeting House | Newbury, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Gilmanton Year-Round Library | Gilmanton Iron Works, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Meredith Public Library | Meredith, NH

This documentary tells the story of life in New Hampshire during the Second World War. Through interviews, historic news film, photos, and radio reports from the battlefields, this documentary and discussion facilitated by John Gfroerer chronicles how a nation, a state, and the citizens of New Hampshire mobilized for war. 

Alumni Hall | Haverhill, NH

The six states known as New England have been romanticized in art and literature for more than 200 years, creating a reality that is touched by myth. How has this myth-making affected the region? Edie Clark, a longtime writer for Yankee magazine, focuses on the work of Robert Frost, Norman Rockwell, Wallace Nutting, and more recently, Yankee magazine. These and others have created such a distinct picture of New England that even the current inhabitants of the region have a hard time knowing whether what they see all around them is real or imagined. 

Fuller Public Library | Hillsborough, NH

Uprooted is a 30-minute documentary based on interviews collected during the Humanities Council's Fences & Neighbors initiative on immigration. It tells the story of five refugees who escaped from war-torn countries to resettle in New Hampshire. The film explores what it means to be a refugee and how it feels to make a new life in a strange place, often without English language skills, family, a job, or community contacts. The film leaves us pondering questions of belonging and citizenship. What does it mean to be an American? Once a refugee, are you destined always to be a refugee?

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Teachers are invited to expand their understanding of the effects of the Civil War in the Granite State at a three-day teacher workshop hosted by the Historical Society of Cheshire County in June. Funded in part by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities, the workshop will examine how people in New Hampshire (with a focus on the Monadnock Region) responded to a divided nation, war, and reconstruction from 1860 through 1877. 
 
Griffin Free Public Library | Auburn, NH

Over the centuries immigrants from the British Isles have come to the Americas bringing with them their musical styles and tastes as well as their instruments. With the concertina, bodhran, mandolin, octave mandolin, guitar, and banjo, Emery Hutchins and Jim Prendergast sing and play this traditional Celtic music, but they also perform American country music in the way it was conceived in the early twentieth century.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Center Harbor Schoolhouse Museum | Center Harbor, NH

In the early 20th Century, the New Hampshire Board of Agriculture launched a program to boost the rural economy and promote tourism through the sale of abandoned farms to summer residents. After introducing the country house movement, Cristina Ashjian focuses attention on some of the great country estates featured in the NH program between 1902 and 1913.  Which private estates were recognized as exemplary, and who were their owners?

Ashland Railroad Station Museum | Ashland, NH

Carrie Brown explores the technological triumph that helped save the Union and then transformed the nation. During the Civil War, northern industry produced a million and a half rifles, along with tens of thousands of pistols and carbines. How did the North produce all of those weapons? The answer lies in new machinery and methods for producing guns with interchangeable parts. Once the system of mass production had been tested and perfected, what happened after the war? In the period from 1870 to 1910 new factory technology and new print media fueled the development of mass consumerism.

Holderness Historical Society, Curry Place | Holderness, NH

Murder and mayhem, robbery and rapine, love that cuts to the bone:  American ballads re-tell the wrenching themes of their English and Scottish cousins. Transplanted in the new world by old world immigrants, the traditional story-song of the Anglos and Scots wound up reinvigorated in the mountains of Appalachia and along the Canadian border.  John Perrault talks, sings, and picks the strings that bind the old ballads to the new.

Saturday, June 25, 2016

Oak Park (directly across form Greenfield State Park) | Greenfield, NH

Singing games, accessible “pocket instruments” like spoons and dancing puppets, tall tales, funny songs, old songs and songs kids teach each other in the playground—all “traditional” in that they have been passed down the generations by word of mouth—will be seen, heard and learned.  We will revisit 1850 or 1910 in a New England town, with families gathered around the kitchen hearth, participating in timeless, hearty entertainment:  a glimpse into how America amused itself before electricity. THIS EVENT IS PART OF THE GREENFIELD 225TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION. 

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Gilmanton Old Town Hall | Gilmanton Iron Works, NH

In 1904, 150 delegates to the National Piano Dealers' convention waved lights and danced around a bonfire made of hundreds of square pianos. Why? What's a square piano? How had middle-class Americans, their instruments and their songs changed over the preceding decades?

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Moultonborough Public Library | Moultonborough, NH

Drawing heavily on the repertoire of traditional singer Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) of Jaffrey and Temple, New Hampshire, Jeff Warner offers the songs and stories that, in the words of Carl Sandburg, tell us "where we came from and what brought us along." These ballads, love songs and comic pieces, reveal the experiences and emotions of daily life in the days before movies, sound recordings and, for some, books.

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Meredith Public Library | Meredith, NH

We all think we know the story of Benedict Arnold, the American Revolutionary War general who fought for the Continental Army but then defected to the British. Recalled mainly as a traitor for his 1780 defection, Arnold had risked his life and fortune for American freedom in courageous exploits between 1775 and 1778, when the dream of independence was at its most fragile.

Wolfeboro Community Center | Wolfeboro, NH

Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go "underground," concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution. Robert Goodby reveals archaeological evidence that shows their deep presence here, inches below the earth's surface.  

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Lane Memorial Library | Hampton, NH

The year is 1876, and New Hampshire's own John Hutchinson sings and tells about his famous musical family "straight from the horse's mouth."  Originally from Milford, NH, the Hutchinson Family Singers were among America's most notable musical entertainers for much of the mid-19th century. They achieved international recognition with songs advancing social reform and political causes such as abolition, temperance, women's suffrage, and the Lincoln presidential campaign of 1860. In this living history program, Steve Blunt portrays John Hutchinson.

Thursday, July 7, 2016

Moultonborough Public Library | Moultonborough, NH

When was the War of 1812? That's a trick question, but if you don't recall America's "Forgotten War" with England , you are not alone. Two hundred years ago, with only 17 armed ships, a youthful United States declared war on the world's largest navy (over, 1,000 warships). Then we invaded Canada. That didn't go well. In retaliation the British burned Washington, DC to the ground. So how come we think we won? J. Dennis Robinson offers an upbeat, often irreverent, slideshow on New Hampshire's reluctant role in "Mr.

Springfield Town Meetinghouse | Springfield, NH

Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.

Friday, July 8, 2016

Campton Public Library | Campton, NH

There is treasure here but not the pirate kind. Scientific "digs" on Smuttynose Island are changing New England history. Archaeologist Nathan Hamilton has unearthed 300,000 artifacts to date on this largely uninhabited rock at the Isles of Shoals. Evidence proves prehistoric Native Americans hunted New Hampshire's only offshore islands 6,000 years ago. Hundreds of European fishermen split, salted, and dried valuable Atlantic cod here from the 1620s.

Goshen Town Hall | Goshen, NH

Woody Pringle and Marek Bennett present an overview of the American Civil War through the lens of period music. Audience members participate and sing along as the presenters explore lyrics, documents, and visual images from sources such as the Library of Congress. Through camp songs, parlor music, hymns, battlefield rallying cries, and fiddle tunes, Pringle and Bennett examine the folksong as a means to enact living history, share perspectives, influence public perceptions of events, and simultaneously fuse and conserve cultures in times of change.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Keene Public Library | Keene, NH

Through architecture unique to northern New England, this illustrated talk focuses on several case studies that show how farmers converted their typical separate house and barns into connected farmsteads. Thomas Hubka's research in his award-winning book, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England, demonstrates that average farmers were, in fact, motivated by competition with farmers in other regions of America, who had better soils and growing seasons and fewer rocks to clear.

Holderness Historical Society, Curry Place | Holderness, NH

In 1892 Lizzie Borden, a 32-year-old single woman, was officially charged with the murder of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. The events that followed the murder would stir the curiosity of people across the nation. After four official criminal proceedings, Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the murder but the case was not officially reinvestigated by the authorities.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Belmont Corner Meeting House | Belmont, NH

Through architecture unique to northern New England, this illustrated talk focuses on several case studies that show how farmers converted their typical separate house and barns into connected farmsteads. Thomas Hubka's research in his award-winning book, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England, demonstrates that average farmers were, in fact, motivated by competition with farmers in other regions of America, who had better soils and growing seasons and fewer rocks to clear.

Merrimack Public Library | Merrimack, NH

Paul Christesen's program explores the connections among sports, meritocracy, and democracy.  Although the idea that sports promote democracy is widely held, social scientists have for the most part argued that sports do exactly the opposite, making it easier for the rich and powerful members of society to hold onto their privileges.

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Lane Memorial Library | Hampton, NH

When was the War of 1812? That's a trick question, but if you don't recall America's "Forgotten War" with England , you are not alone. Two hundred years ago, with only 17 armed ships, a youthful United States declared war on the world's largest navy (over, 1,000 warships). Then we invaded Canada. That didn't go well. In retaliation the British burned Washington, DC to the ground. So how come we think we won? J. Dennis Robinson offers an upbeat, often irreverent, slideshow on New Hampshire's reluctant role in "Mr.

Freedom Town Hall | Freedom, NH

Government regulations, licensing, handling drunks, controlling the flow of information --why would the Colonial-era government allow women to run a tavern? When her husband died in 1736, Ann Jose Harvey became the owner of a prominent Portsmouth tavern and sole guardian of seven small children. For at least twenty years, Harvey ran the increasingly prosperous establishment. Using documents related to Harvey's venue, Marcia Schmidt Blaine explores the world of female tavern keepers. A tavern was potentially the most disruptive spot in town. Why would a woman want to keep one? 

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Libby Museum | Wolfeboro, NH

New Hampshire has lost many of its important historic buildings to fire, neglect, intentional demolition and re-development.  In some cases, a plaque or marker provides a physical reminder of what was, but in other examples, no tangible evidence remains.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Stephenson Memorial Library | Greenfield, NH

The native Abenaki people played a central role in the history of the Monadnock region, defending it against  English settlement and forcing the abandonment of Keene and other Monadnock area towns during the French and Indian Wars. Despite this, little is known about the Abenaki, and conventional histories often depict the first Europeans entering an untamed, uninhabited wilderness, rather than the homeland of people who had been there for hundreds of generations.

Sunday, July 31, 2016

Center Meeting House | Newbury, NH

New Hampshire has lost many of its important historic buildings to fire, neglect, intentional demolition and re-development.  In some cases, a plaque or marker provides a physical reminder of what was, but in other examples, no tangible evidence remains.

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Fitzwilliam Town Library | Fitzwilliam, NH

Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.  

Thursday, August 4, 2016

Holderness Historical Society, Curry Place | Holderness, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

Monday, August 8, 2016

Camp Morgan Lodge | Washington, NH

From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history.

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Salem Meeting House | Salem, NH

The first agricultural fair in North America was held in what is now Londonderry in 1722, and it would become a wildly popular event lasting for generations until it came to be so dominated by gambling, flim-flam, and other "scandalous dimensions" that the legislature revoked its charter in 1850. But fairs have always had strong supporters and eventually the state came around to appropriating modest sums to help them succeed. Temperance groups and others would continue to attack the fairs on moral grounds and their close connection to horse racing was a chronic flashpoint.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Plymouth Senior Center | Plymouth, NH

Living historian Sally Mummey portrays Mary Todd Lincoln as she muses on her life from her dreams as a girl to her years as First Lady during the Civil War. Mrs. Lincoln shares stories of her life with President Lincoln and the events of that evening in Ford's Theatre when the assassin's bullet not only changed the course of the nation but destroyed her life as well. From the opulence of the White House to the dregs of obscurity, Mrs. Lincoln lived out her life struggling with affliction and tragedy.

Sheridan House Museum | Ashuelot, NH

Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape.

Ashland Railroad Station Museum | Ashland, NH

New Hampshire has lost many of its important historic buildings to fire, neglect, intentional demolition and re-development.  In some cases, a plaque or marker provides a physical reminder of what was, but in other examples, no tangible evidence remains.

Moultonborough Public Library | Moultonborough, NH

This illustrated presentation by Marina Forbes focuses on the life and remarkable work of Russian master jeweler and artist, Peter Carl Fabergé. The program features a photo-tour of Fabergé collections at the Constantine Palace in St. Petersburg and from major museums and private collectors around the world. Explore the important role of egg painting in Russian culture and the development of this major Russian art form from a traditional craft to the level of exquisite fine art under the patronage of the tsars.

Sunday, August 14, 2016

Center Meeting House | Newbury, NH

New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities.  Using photographs of the few surviving "mint condition" meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.

Monday, August 15, 2016

Taylor Community Woodside Building | Laconia, NH

New Hampshire's White Mountains played a leading role in events leading to the Weeks Act, the law that created the eastern national forests.  Focusing on Concord's Joseph B. Walker and the Forest Society's Philip Ayres, Marcia Schmidt Blaine explores the relationship between our mountains and the economic, environmental and aesthetic questions posed by the individuals involved in the creation of the National Forest.     

North Hampton Town Hall | North Hampton, NH

Visually explore the tremendous legacy of New Hampshire's architecture from the Victorian period (1820 - 1914). This program looks at exuberant Victorian-era architecture across the state in houses, hotels, mills, city halls, courthouses, and churches, with references to gardens, furniture, and other elements of the built environment. Richard Guy Wilson explores elements of visual literacy and points out how architecture can reflect the cultural and civic values of its time and place. 

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Abbie Greenleaf Library | Franconia, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

Abbie Greenleaf Library | Franconia, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Ashland Booster Clubhouse | Ashland, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Freedom Town Hall | Freedom, NH

Post cards have many a story to tell about the built landscape, disastrous events such as fires or floods, daily folk customs, and the identity of place. During the golden age of the post card, before telephones, personal messages could contain anything from the mundane, ?Having a fine time, wish you were here...? to more profound reflections on family life or colorful portraits of towns and cities from the perspective of newly-landed immigrants. Vintage post cards of Manchester offer a lively, nostalgic adventure through a major industrial center, home to people from around the world.

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Upper Valley Senior Center | Lebanon, NH

Government regulations, licensing, handling drunks, controlling the flow of information --why would the Colonial-era government allow women to run a tavern? When her husband died in 1736, Ann Jose Harvey became the owner of a prominent Portsmouth tavern and sole guardian of seven small children. For at least twenty years, Harvey ran the increasingly prosperous establishment. Using documents related to Harvey's venue, Marcia Schmidt Blaine explores the world of female tavern keepers. A tavern was potentially the most disruptive spot in town. Why would a woman want to keep one? 

 

Madison Historical Society | Madison, NH

Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution. A SHORT HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING WILL TAKE PLACE AT 7:00PM WITH PROGRAM TO FOLLOW AT 7:15PM.

Friday, August 19, 2016

Lakefalls Lodge | Munsonville, NH

"Your Hit Parade" aired on radio and then on television from 1935 to 1959. It set the standard for American popular music. Calvin Knickerbocker outlines a quarter century of the show's history as a "tastemaker" featuring songs inspired by the Great Depression and on through the advent of rock and roll. He explores the show's relationship with sponsor American Tobacco and Lucky Strike cigarettes and shares stories about the artists the show helped launch and promote, from Frank Sinatra to Elvis. A POTLUCK WILL BEGIN AT 5:00 PM WITH PROGRAM TO FOLLOW AT 7:30PM.

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Franklin Pierce Homestead | Hillsborough, NH

General Lafayette, born the Marquis de Lafayette in Auvergne, France, was truly an American Idol in the 19th century. One proof is that more than 80 American counties, cities, towns, and countless roads were named in his honor, from Lafayette Road in Portsmouth to Mount Lafayette in Franconia.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Franklin Pierce Homestead | Hillsborough, NH

General Lafayette, born the Marquis de Lafayette in Auvergne, France, was truly an American Idol in the 19th century. One proof is that more than 80 American counties, cities, towns, and countless roads were named in his honor, from Lafayette Road in Portsmouth to Mount Lafayette in Franconia.

Deering Community Church | Deering, NH

When 18th century wives tired of the marriage contract, they could run, but they could not hide. Husbands chased them down via newspaper ads, effectively removing their sources of credit and income. In the vocabulary of the war between the sexes, one reads of surprisingly enduring economic and social barriers to runaway wives. Marcia Schmidt Blaine explores this Colonial era challenge in this illustrated program.

Wilmot Town Hall | Wilmot, NH

The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry.

Phillips Barn (New London Historical Society) | New London, NH

Singing games, accessible “pocket instruments” like spoons and dancing puppets, tall tales, funny songs, old songs and songs kids teach each other in the playground—all “traditional” in that they have been passed down the generations by word of mouth—will be seen, heard and learned.  We will revisit 1850 or 1910 in a New England town, with families gathered around the kitchen hearth, participating in timeless, hearty entertainment:  a glimpse into how America amused itself before electricity.

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Quincy Bog Nature Center | Rumney, NH

Lucie Therrien follows the migration of French-Canadians and the evolution of their traditional music:  its arrival in North America from France; the music's crossing with Indian culture during the evangelization of Acadia and Quebec; its growth alongside English culture after British colonization; and its expansion from Quebec to New England, as well as from Acadia to Louisiana. 

Tuftonboro Historical Society | Melvin Village, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Pierce Manse | Concord, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

Sunday, August 28, 2016

Stone School Museum | Newmarket, NH

Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Alumni Hall | Haverhill, NH

During World War II, 300 German prisoners of war were held at Camp Stark near the village of Stark in New Hampshire's North Country. Allen Koop reveals the history of this camp, which tells us much about our country's war experience and about our state.  

 

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Moultonborough Historical Society Museum | Moultonborough, NH

From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history.

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Community Church of New Boston | New Boston, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

Lane Tavern | Sanbornton, NH

"Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.

Holderness Historical Society, Curry Place | Holderness, NH

Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the "Gettysburg Address." Along the way he comments on the debates with Stephen Douglas, his run for the presidency, and the Civil War.  

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Deering Community Church | Deering, NH

Telling personal and family stories is fun - and much more. Storytelling connects strangers, strengthens links between generations, and gives children the self-knowledge to carry them through hard times. Knowledge of family history has even been linked to better teen behavior and mental health. In this active and interactive program, storyteller Jo Radner shares foolproof ways to mine memories and interview relatives for meaningful stories. Participants practices finding, developing, and telling their own tales.

Groton Town Hall | Groton, NH

Living historian Sally Mummey portrays Mary Todd Lincoln as she muses on her life from her dreams as a girl to her years as First Lady during the Civil War. Mrs. Lincoln shares stories of her life with President Lincoln and the events of that evening in Ford's Theatre when the assassin's bullet not only changed the course of the nation but destroyed her life as well. From the opulence of the White House to the dregs of obscurity, Mrs. Lincoln lived out her life struggling with affliction and tragedy.

Monday, September 12, 2016

Moultonborough Public Library | Moultonborough, NH

Take Scandinavian and Austrian immigrants, the Dartmouth Outing Club, the Cannon Mountain Tramway, the muscular Christian, amateur tinkers, and Professor E. John B. Allen. Cover it with snow and shake, and you have all the makings of a unique New Hampshire history. 

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Ashland School Cafeteria | Ashland, NH

From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history.

Elkins Public Library | Canterbury, NH

Based on recently discovered historical materials and recent books, this program by Douglas Wheeler is an inquiry into the life and death of America's first spy, the patriot-martyr, Nathan Hale, of Coventry, Connecticut. Wheeler takes audiences on a journey through the spy world of the Culper Spy Ring of New York, Long Island and Connecticut, the most secret of the American spy rings and the most successful in getting useful intelligence to General George Washington beginning in 1778, two years after Hale's tragic execution by the British.

J. Smith Grange | Lee, NH

Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Wilton Public & Gregg Free Library | Wilton, NH

This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. Cottrell will be accompanied by his appropriately named Chinook,Tug.

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Blaisdell Memorial Library | Nottingham, NH

From Seabrook to Colebrook, Berlin to Hinsdale, New Hampshire's towns, individuals and veterans organizations erected a fascinating assortment of memorials to The War of the Rebellion.  Beginning with obelisks of the 1860s and continuing to re-mastered works of the 21st century, historian George Morrison presents a diverse selection of New Hampshire's commemorations.

Rumney Historic Society | Rumney, NH

Musical humorist Charles Ross Taggart grew up in Topsham, Vermont, going on to perform in various lyceum and Chautauqua circuits all across the country for over 40 years starting in 1895.  A fiddler, piano player, comedian, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 40 recordings on various labels, as well as appearing in an early talking movie four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Adam Boyce portrays Mr. Taggart near the end of Taggart's career, c.

Piermont Old Church Building | Piermont, NH

When 18th century wives tired of the marriage contract, they could run, but they could not hide. Husbands chased them down via newspaper ads, effectively removing their sources of credit and income. In the vocabulary of the war between the sexes, one reads of surprisingly enduring economic and social barriers to runaway wives. Marcia Schmidt Blaine explores this Colonial era challenge in this illustrated program.

Friday, September 16, 2016

Folsom Tavern - 2nd Floor | Exeter, NH

The Granite State came very close to voting against ratification of the proposed Federal Constitution. Had it done so, the nation we know today might not exist. What tactics did supporters of ratification use to snatch victory from defeat? Your town may have played a definitive role and Jere Daniell knows all about it. PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. PLEASE CALL ABBY PIETRANTONIO AT 772-2622 OR EMAIL AT APIETRANTONIO@INDEPENDENCEMUSEUM.ORG TO REGISTER.

Monday, September 19, 2016

Havenwood Auditorium | Concord, NH

Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner.

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Wiggin Memorial Library | Stratham, NH

Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner.

Gilmanton Year-Round Library | Gilmanton Iron Works, NH

Louis Wagner was accused of murdering Anethe and Karen Christenson on Smuttynose Island, Isles of Shoals, in March of 1873.  He was convicted on the first charge and executed in 1875.  Although sentiment against Wagner was at a fever pitch immediately following the murders, time and reflection have generated an ongoing debate as to the fairness of the trial and the validity of the verdict.  John Perrault invites you to examine the judgment of Louis Wagner.  Perrault weaves his "Ballad of Louis Wagner" through the course of the program with guitar and vocal. 

Meredith Public Library | Meredith, NH

In the 20th century the U.S. Supreme Court came to be a powerful force in modern society. Richard Hesse discusses how its members are chosen and how it operates. Explore familiar examples of historical and contemporary debates over social policy and take a more careful look at this peculiarly "anti-democratic" institution.   

Fuller Public Library | Hillsborough, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.  Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place.  She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. 

Belmont Corner Meeting House | Belmont, NH

We all think we know the story of Benedict Arnold, the American Revolutionary War general who fought for the Continental Army but then defected to the British. Recalled mainly as a traitor for his 1780 defection, Arnold had risked his life and fortune for American freedom in courageous exploits between 1775 and 1778, when the dream of independence was at its most fragile.

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Conway Public Library | Conway, NH

Woody Pringle and Marek Bennett present an overview of the American Civil War through the lens of period music. Audience members participate and sing along as the presenters explore lyrics, documents, and visual images from sources such as the Library of Congress. Through camp songs, parlor music, hymns, battlefield rallying cries, and fiddle tunes, Pringle and Bennett examine the folksong as a means to enact living history, share perspectives, influence public perceptions of events, and simultaneously fuse and conserve cultures in times of change.

Silsby Free Public Library | Charlestown, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Paul Memorial Library | Newfields, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

 

Bedford Town Hall | Bedford, NH

Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner.

Newton Town Hall | Newton, NH

The year is 1876, and New Hampshire's own John Hutchinson sings and tells about his famous musical family "straight from the horse's mouth."  Originally from Milford, NH, the Hutchinson Family Singers were among America's most notable musical entertainers for much of the mid-19th century. They achieved international recognition with songs advancing social reform and political causes such as abolition, temperance, women's suffrage, and the Lincoln presidential campaign of 1860. In this living history program, Steve Blunt portrays John Hutchinson.

Chamberlin Free Public Library | Greenville, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.  Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place.  She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. 

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Mountain View Senior Center | Bradford, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.  Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place.  She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. MOUNTAIN VIEW SENIOR CENTER WILL BE CELEBRATING SENIOR WEEK ON THIS DATE IN THE SENIOR DINING ROOM FROM 11:30AM TO 12:30PM. PROGRAM WILL FOLLOW AT 12:30PM.

Jaffrey Civic Center | Jaffrey, NH

Fiddle contests evolved from endurance marathons to playing a set number of tunes judged by certain specific criteria.  Whether large or small, fiddle contests tried to show who was the "best," as well as preserve old-time fiddling and raise money for local organizations.  In recent years, the fiddle contest has declined significantly in New England due to cultural changes and financial viability.  The greatest legacies of these contests were recordings made during live competition.

Friday, September 23, 2016

Meredith Bay Colony Club | Meredith, NH

There is treasure here but not the pirate kind. Scientific "digs" on Smuttynose Island are changing New England history. Archaeologist Nathan Hamilton has unearthed 300,000 artifacts to date on this largely uninhabited rock at the Isles of Shoals. Evidence proves prehistoric Native Americans hunted New Hampshire's only offshore islands 6,000 years ago. Hundreds of European fishermen split, salted, and dried valuable Atlantic cod here from the 1620s.

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Cook Memorial Library | Tamworth, NH

"Once upon a time. . ." is a magical phrase that promises the beginning of a memorable story. Where do our fairy tales come from, what do they tell us about ourselves and our history? Why have they been censored and changed and how have they retained their currency and popularity today? Ingrid Graff discusses these fascinating tales and why we should keep telling them to our children. Participants are encouraged to bring their favorite fairy tale to the presentation. COOK MEMORIAL LIBRARY ANNUAL MEETING WILL BE HELD AT 11:30 AM. PROGRAM AND LUNCHEON WILL FOLLOW AT 12:00PM.

Sunday, September 25, 2016

Marlborough Community House | Marlborough, NH

Lucie Therrien follows the migration of French-Canadians and the evolution of their traditional music:  its arrival in North America from France; the music's crossing with Indian culture during the evangelization of Acadia and Quebec; its growth alongside English culture after British colonization; and its expansion from Quebec to New England, as well as from Acadia to Louisiana. 

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Wilmot Public Library | Wilmot, NH

Allen Koop describes how the troubled, promising, and unique American health care system has been shaped, not only by developments in medicine, but also by by social forces, economic trends, party politics, and by historical surprises. The lecture moves rapidly from Colonial times, through era of sectarian medicine, then the accomplishments of modern medicine, and concludes in the health care tensions of the 21st century.

 

Gilmanton Old Town Hall | Gilmanton Iron Works, NH

A native of Newport, New Hampshire, America's first female editor, Sarah Josepha Hale, made Godey's Lady's Book the most influential women's magazine of its time. She is also known as the author of the poem "Mary's Lamb" and for her efforts over three decades to have Thanksgiving decreed a national holiday. In this living history set in 1866, Sharon Wood portrays Ann Wyman Blake, a resident of West Cambridge, Massachusetts, speaking of her admiration for Hale.

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Weeks Public Library | Greenland, NH

Government regulations, licensing, handling drunks, controlling the flow of information --why would the Colonial-era government allow women to run a tavern? When her husband died in 1736, Ann Jose Harvey became the owner of a prominent Portsmouth tavern and sole guardian of seven small children. For at least twenty years, Harvey ran the increasingly prosperous establishment. Using documents related to Harvey's venue, Marcia Schmidt Blaine explores the world of female tavern keepers. A tavern was potentially the most disruptive spot in town. Why would a woman want to keep one? 

Cook Memorial Library | Tamworth, NH

The first agricultural fair in North America was held in what is now Londonderry in 1722, and it would become a wildly popular event lasting for generations until it came to be so dominated by gambling, flim-flam, and other "scandalous dimensions" that the legislature revoked its charter in 1850. But fairs have always had strong supporters and eventually the state came around to appropriating modest sums to help them succeed. Temperance groups and others would continue to attack the fairs on moral grounds and their close connection to horse racing was a chronic flashpoint.

Gorham Public Library | Gorham, NH

Patrick Anderson focuses on contemporary film directors and screenwriters in the United States whose originality, independence and unconventional approaches to the medium have contributed to the evolution of the industry.

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Madbury Public Library | Madbury, NH

Marina Forbes shares many examples of Matroyshka nested dolls, including examples of her own work and from her extensive collection, as she examines the rich folk tradition and symbolism of the dolls' appearance. She explores the link between doll making and other traditional Russian art forms. There will be a quick stop at the 1900 World's Fair in Paris that made Russian nested dolls and Fabergé eggs famous, followed by an illustrated tour of a working doll-making factory in rural Russia. 

Monday, October 3, 2016

Smith Memorial Congregational Church UCC | Hillsborough, NH

"Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.

 

Camp Morgan Lodge | Washington, NH

The largest river in New England rises in a small beaver pond near the Canadian border and flows over 400 miles through four states, falling 2,670 feet to the sea through America's only watershed-based national fish and wildlife refuge. Adair Mulligan leads an armchair tour of this great river in New Hampshire and Vermont, exploring its history and natural beauty through the seasons and among the communities that have sprung up along its banks. Next, the discussion will shift to how the river has influenced the lives of those who live there, and how they, in turn, have affected the river.

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Gilford Public Library | Gilford, NH

New Hampshire has lost many of its important historic buildings to fire, neglect, intentional demolition and re-development.  In some cases, a plaque or marker provides a physical reminder of what was, but in other examples, no tangible evidence remains.

Folsom Tavern - 2nd Floor | Exeter, NH

Alan Hoffman explores the role Lafayette played as a symbol of Franco-American friendship both during his lifetime, principally from 1777 to 1792, and after his death. To the extent the American people remember Lafayette, they recall his role in our Revolution and his activities on behalf of American interests in the 1780's.

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Blaisdell Memorial Library | Nottingham, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Thursday, October 6, 2016

Kimball Public Library | Atkinson, NH

From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history.

Franklin Public Library - Upstairs | Franklin, NH

Woody Pringle and Marek Bennett present an overview of the American Civil War through the lens of period music. Audience members participate and sing along as the presenters explore lyrics, documents, and visual images from sources such as the Library of Congress. Through camp songs, parlor music, hymns, battlefield rallying cries, and fiddle tunes, Pringle and Bennett examine the folksong as a means to enact living history, share perspectives, influence public perceptions of events, and simultaneously fuse and conserve cultures in times of change.

Springfield Town Meetinghouse | Springfield, NH

Since the late 1600s, the lively tradition of contra dancing has kept people of all ages swinging and sashaying in barns, town halls, and schools around the state.  Contra dancing came to New Hampshire by way of the English colonists and remains popular in many communities, particularly in the Monadnock Region. Presenter Dudley Laufman brings this tradition to life with stories, poems and recordings of callers, musicians, and dancers, past and present. Live music, always integral to this dance form, will be played on the fiddle and melodeon.

Friday, October 7, 2016

Goodwin Library | Farmington, NH

"Your Hit Parade" aired on radio and then on television from 1935 to 1959. It set the standard for American popular music. Calvin Knickerbocker outlines a quarter century of the show's history as a "tastemaker" featuring songs inspired by the Great Depression and on through the advent of rock and roll. He explores the show's relationship with sponsor American Tobacco and Lucky Strike cigarettes and shares stories about the artists the show helped launch and promote, from Frank Sinatra to Elvis. 

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Lawrence Barn Community Center | Hollis, NH

Based on recently discovered historical materials and recent books, this program by Douglas Wheeler is an inquiry into the life and death of America's first spy, the patriot-martyr, Nathan Hale, of Coventry, Connecticut. Wheeler takes audiences on a journey through the spy world of the Culper Spy Ring of New York, Long Island and Connecticut, the most secret of the American spy rings and the most successful in getting useful intelligence to General George Washington beginning in 1778, two years after Hale's tragic execution by the British.

Elkins Public Library | Canterbury, NH

On first impression, the witchcraft trials of the Colonial era may seem to have been nothing but a free-for-all, fraught with hysterics. Margo Burns explores an array of prosecutions in seventeenth century New England, using facsimiles of primary source manuscripts, from first formal complaints to arrest warrants, indictments of formal charges to death warrants, and the reversals of attainder and rescinding of excommunications years after the fact; demonstrating how methodically and logically the Salem Court worked.

Madbury Town Hall | Madbury, NH

The native Abenaki people played a central role in the history of the Monadnock region, defending it against  English settlement and forcing the abandonment of Keene and other Monadnock area towns during the French and Indian Wars. Despite this, little is known about the Abenaki, and conventional histories often depict the first Europeans entering an untamed, uninhabited wilderness, rather than the homeland of people who had been there for hundreds of generations.

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

White Mountains Community College Fortier Library | Berlin, NH

A native of Newport, New Hampshire, America's first female editor, Sarah Josepha Hale, made Godey's Lady's Book the most influential women's magazine of its time. She is also known as the author of the poem "Mary's Lamb" and for her efforts over three decades to have Thanksgiving decreed a national holiday. In this living history set in 1866, Sharon Wood portrays Ann Wyman Blake, a resident of West Cambridge, Massachusetts, speaking of her admiration for Hale.

Pelham Public Library | Pelham, NH

"Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Brookline Public Library | Brookline, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Hollis Social Library | Hollis, NH

In 1892 Lizzie Borden, a 32-year-old single woman, was officially charged with the murder of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. The events that followed the murder would stir the curiosity of people across the nation. After four official criminal proceedings, Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the murder but the case was not officially reinvestigated by the authorities.

Piermont Old Church Building | Piermont, NH

New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities.  Using photographs of the few surviving "mint condition" meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.  

Fitzwilliam Town Library | Fitzwilliam, NH

"Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.

Saturday, October 15, 2016

Joseph Patch Library | Warren, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

Sunday, October 16, 2016

Ray-Fre Senior Center | Raymond, NH

Baked Beans, fried clams, fish chowder, Indian pudding - so many foods are distinctive to New England. This talk offers a celebration of these regional favorites along with an examination of how contemporary life has distanced us from these classics. What makes them special and how do these foods define our region? Edie Clark draws from such diverse resources as Fannie Farmer, Julia Child, and Haydn S.

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Goffstown Public Library | Goffstown, NH

Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.

Merrimack Public Library | Merrimack, NH

Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.  

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

White Mountains Community College Fortier Library | Berlin, NH

"Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.

Josiah Bartlett Elementary School - Community Room | Bartlett, NH

Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape.

East Andover Grange Hall | East Andover, NH

New Hampshire's White Mountains played a leading role in events leading to the Weeks Act, the law that created the eastern national forests.  Focusing on Concord's Joseph B. Walker and the Forest Society's Philip Ayres, Marcia Schmidt Blaine explores the relationship between our mountains and the economic, environmental and aesthetic questions posed by the individuals involved in the creation of the National Forest.     

Friday, October 21, 2016

Whipple Free Library | New Boston, NH

"Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.

The Curious George Cottage | Waterville Valley, NH

Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.  

Stoddard Town Hall | Stoddard, NH

Since the late 1600s, the lively tradition of contra dancing has kept people of all ages swinging and sashaying in barns, town halls, and schools around the state.  Contra dancing came to New Hampshire by way of the English colonists and remains popular in many communities, particularly in the Monadnock Region. Presenter Dudley Laufman brings this tradition to life with stories, poems and recordings of callers, musicians, and dancers, past and present. Live music, always integral to this dance form, will be played on the fiddle and melodeon.

Saturday, October 22, 2016

Bath Town Hall | Bath, NH

"Your Hit Parade" aired on radio and then on television from 1935 to 1959. It set the standard for American popular music. Calvin Knickerbocker outlines a quarter century of the show's history as a "tastemaker" featuring songs inspired by the Great Depression and on through the advent of rock and roll. He explores the show's relationship with sponsor American Tobacco and Lucky Strike cigarettes and shares stories about the artists the show helped launch and promote, from Frank Sinatra to Elvis. 

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Auburn Safety Center | Auburn, NH

Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.  

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Barrington Public Library | Barrington, NH

Louis Wagner was accused of murdering Anethe and Karen Christenson on Smuttynose Island, Isles of Shoals, in March of 1873.  He was convicted on the first charge and executed in 1875.  Although sentiment against Wagner was at a fever pitch immediately following the murders, time and reflection have generated an ongoing debate as to the fairness of the trial and the validity of the verdict.  John Perrault invites you to examine the judgment of Louis Wagner.  Perrault weaves his "Ballad of Louis Wagner" through the course of the program with guitar and vocal. 

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Minot-Sleeper Library | Bristol, NH

Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.  

Pierce Manse | Concord, NH

Much of rural New Hampshire in the late 19th century was locked in a downward spiral of population decline, abandonment of farms, reversion of cleared land to forest and widespread feelings of melancholy and loss. The development of the Grange movement in the 1880s and 1890s was aided greatly by hunger for social interaction, entertainment and mutual support. As membership surged it became a major force in policymaking in Concord, and its agenda aligned closely with the Progressive politics that swept the state in early 20th century.

Aaron Cutler Memorial Library | Litchfield, NH

In 1892 Lizzie Borden, a 32-year-old single woman, was officially charged with the murder of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. The events that followed the murder would stir the curiosity of people across the nation. After four official criminal proceedings, Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the murder but the case was not officially reinvestigated by the authorities.

Saturday, October 29, 2016

Danville Old Meeting House & Cemetery | Danville, NH

Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire. WEATHER PERMITTING, THIS WILL INCLUDE A WALKING TOUR OF ONE OR MORE OF THE NEARBY CEMETERIES.   

Sunday, October 30, 2016

Center Meeting House | Newbury, NH

The history of Native American site desecration and looting in the Americas is well known. New Hampshire has its share of similar stories, but the valuing and protection of these historic sites in NH did not just begin with the passage of a Native burial protection law in the early 1990s. In the 1820s the "giant by the lake," the remains of an Abenaki man found in Melvin Village on Lake Winnipesaukee, was carefully reburied near his original burial location. John and Donna Moody explore the history of burial and site destruction, repatriation, and site protection in the Granite State.  

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Tuck Museum | Hampton, NH

Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era.

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Historical Society of Cheshire County | Keene, NH

This documentary and discussion, facilitated by John Gfroerer, tells the story of William Loeb, publisher of the Manchester Union Leader. It traces Loeb's rise to be one of the most influential voices in New Hampshire. Through interviews, archival material, and news footage, it documents his influence on the state. The documentary also chronicles the history of New Hampshire from 1950 to 1985, bringing to life such figures as Governors Walter Peterson, Wesley Powell, and Meldrim Thomson. 

Gorham Public Library | Gorham, NH

Musical humorist Charles Ross Taggart grew up in Topsham, Vermont, going on to perform in various lyceum and Chautauqua circuits all across the country for over 40 years starting in 1895.  A fiddler, piano player, comedian, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 40 recordings on various labels, as well as appearing in an early talking movie four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Adam Boyce portrays Mr. Taggart near the end of Taggart's career, c.

Thursday, November 10, 2016

Auburn Safety Center | Auburn, NH

This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. Cottrell will be accompanied by his appropriately named Chinook, Tug.

Sunday, November 13, 2016

Speare Museum | Nashua, NH

Lucie Therrien follows the migration of French-Canadians and the evolution of their traditional music:  its arrival in North America from France; the music's crossing with Indian culture during the evangelization of Acadia and Quebec; its growth alongside English culture after British colonization; and its expansion from Quebec to New England, as well as from Acadia to Louisiana. 

Monday, November 14, 2016

Stratham Fire Station Meeting Room | Stratham, NH

Speaking as Betsey Phelps, the mother of a Union soldier from Amherst, New Hampshire who died heroically at the Battle of Gettysburg, Sharon Wood offers an informative and sensitive reflection on that sacrifice from a mother's perspective.  Wood blends the Phelps boy's story with those of other men who left their New Hampshire homes to fight for the Union cause and of the families who supported them on the home front.  

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Merrimack Public Library | Merrimack, NH

Since the late 1600s, the lively tradition of contra dancing has kept people of all ages swinging and sashaying in barns, town halls, and schools around the state.  Contra dancing came to New Hampshire by way of the English colonists and remains popular in many communities, particularly in the Monadnock Region. Presenter Dudley Laufman brings this tradition to life with stories, poems and recordings of callers, musicians, and dancers, past and present. Live music, always integral to this dance form, will be played on the fiddle and melodeon.

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Litchfield Community Church | Litchfield, NH

The year is 1876, and New Hampshire's own John Hutchinson sings and tells about his famous musical family "straight from the horse's mouth."  Originally from Milford, NH, the Hutchinson Family Singers were among America's most notable musical entertainers for much of the mid-19th century. They achieved international recognition with songs advancing social reform and political causes such as abolition, temperance, women's suffrage, and the Lincoln presidential campaign of 1860. In this living history program, Steve Blunt portrays John Hutchinson.

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Madbury Town Hall | Madbury, NH

Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity.  Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place.  She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. PROGRAM BEGINS AT 6:30 PM WITH MADBURY COMMUNITY CLUB ANNUAL PIE POTLUCK TO FOLLOW DIRECTLY AFTER PROGRAM.