Welcome!

All the events listed in this calendar are funded in whole or part by New Hampshire Humanities. All are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. Many of these events are Humanities to Go programs your organization can book, made possible in part by generous support from

 


 

View a PDF of our FEBRUARY Calendar here.
(To view previous editions of the Calendar, click here.)

Our Humanities to Go Catalog is available online! Click here to view it as a flip book, or click here for PDF.

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Dimond Library Special Collections | Durham, NH

This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. 

 

Rivendell High School Multipurpose Room | Orford, NH

This documentary and discussion, facilitated by John Gfroerer, tells the story of William Loeb, publisher of the Manchester Union Leader. It traces Loeb's rise to be one of the most influential voices in New Hampshire. Through interviews, archival material, and news footage, it documents his influence on the state. The documentary also chronicles the history of New Hampshire from 1950 to 1985, bringing to life such figures as Governors Walter Peterson, Wesley Powell, and Meldrim Thomson. 

Sunday, February 4, 2018

Wilmot Community Association Red Barn | Wilmot, NH

Quilts tell stories, and quilt history is full of myths and misinformation as well as heart-warming tales of service and tradition. Nearly every world culture that has cold weather uses quilted textiles-quilting is NOT just an American art. Pam Weeks weaves world history, women's history, industrial history and just plain wonderful stories into her presentation. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification and/or story sharing.

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Hill Library | Strafford, NH

This event has been rescheduled to Thursday Feb. 15 at 6:30 pm at the Hill Library in Strafford.

Portsmouth Public Library | Portsmouth, NH

Has the road to “homecoming” and adjustment back to civilian life been harder and longer than you expected? As a spouse or family member, have you struggled with changes created by deployment and homecoming? Please join us for a weekly reading and discussion group for veterans, family members & friends of veterans. Read more HERE.

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Tad's Place Cultural Arts Center at Heritage Heights | Concord, NH

From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history.

Seabrook Library | Seabrook, NH

New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities.  Using photographs of the few surviving "mint condition" meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.  

NH Theatre Project WEST | Porstmouth, NH

There’s so much that needs healing in our world... why are we uncomfortable talking about it? New Hampshire Theatre Project is not only talking about these issues—they’ve launched a provocative series, Elephant in the Room, about subjects that we as a society often have difficulty discussing. Supported in part by a Community Project Grant, each program in the series includes a playreading and a facilitated discussion among audience members, artists, and a panel of experts on the topic.

Saturday, February 10, 2018

Olivia Rodham Memorial Library | Nelson, NH

Rudyard Kipling was the most internationally-celebrated author of his day. The first four years of his marriage and fatherhood were spent in New England where he built his dream house - Naulakha in Dummerston, Vermont - now preserved as a Landmark Trust property. It was there that he penned The Jungle Book and other classics. These were productive and happy years for the young literary giant, but eventually deeply troubled.

Harvey-Mitchell Memorial Library | Epping, NH

Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner.

Sunday, February 11, 2018

Lawrence Barn | Hollis, NH

Distinctly different paths led Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd to Springfield, Illinois, where they met, married and began a family. The years that followed their move to the White House were filled with personal and national crises. Steve and Sharon Wood portray President and Mrs. Lincoln in this living history program, telling stories of their early lives and the challenges they faced during this turbulent time in our country's history.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Pembroke Masonic Hall | Pembroke, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

 

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Hill Library | Strafford, NH

Take Scandinavian and Austrian immigrants, the Dartmouth Outing Club, the Cannon Mountain Tramway, the muscular Christian, amateur tinkerers, and Professor E. John B. Allen. Cover it with snow and shake, and you have all the makings of a unique New Hampshire history.

Sunday, February 18, 2018

Friendship House | South Newbury, NH

Oney Judge Staines, according to the Constitution, was only three-fifths of a person. To her masters, George and Martha Washington, she was merely "the girl." All she wanted was the freedom to control her own actions, but her account of escaping the Executive Mansion in Philadelphia, fleeing north and establishing a life in New Hampshire is not a typical runaway story.

St. John's Episcopal Church Thaxter Hall | Portsmouth, NH

Traditional Russian icon painting has been a living and evolving art form for more than 1,000 years. This illustrated presentation by Marina Forbes deals with the spiritual and secular significance of Russian religious art from the 10th century to the present day. Icon-making involves the painting of stylized religious images on wood using traditional natural materials and techniques which are determined by longstanding conventions.

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Emmanuel Advent Christian Church | Rochester, NH

Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the "Gettysburg Address." Along the way he comments on the debates with Stephen Douglas, his run for the presidency, and the Civil War.  

 

Dunbarton Public Library | Dunbarton, NH

We all think we know the story of Benedict Arnold, the American Revolutionary War general who fought for the Continental Army but then defected to the British. Recalled mainly as a traitor for his 1780 defection, Arnold had risked his life and fortune for American freedom in courageous exploits between 1775 and 1778, when the dream of independence was at its most fragile.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Durham Public Library | Durham, NH

In 1835, abolitionists opened one of the nation's first integrated schools in Canaan, NH, attracting eager African-American students from as far away as Boston, Providence, and New York City. Outraged community leaders responded by raising a mob that dragged the academy building off its foundation and ran the African-American students out of town. New Hampshire's first experiment in educational equality was brief, but it helped launch the public careers of a trio of extraordinary African-American leaders: Henry Highland Garnet, Alexander Crummell, and Thomas Sipkins Sidney.

Davis Public Library | Stoddard, NH

Take Scandinavian and Austrian immigrants, the Dartmouth Outing Club, the Cannon Mountain Tramway, the muscular Christian, amateur tinkerers, and Professor E. John B. Allen. Cover it with snow and shake, and you have all the makings of a unique New Hampshire history.

Saturday, February 24, 2018

Bath Public Library | Bath, NH

The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry.

Monday, February 26, 2018

Hill Town Hall | Hill, NH

Quilts tell stories, and quilt history is full of myths and misinformation as well as heart-warming tales of service and tradition. Nearly every world culture that has cold weather uses quilted textiles-quilting is NOT just an American art. Pam Weeks weaves world history, women's history, industrial history and just plain wonderful stories into her presentation. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification and/or story sharing.

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Amherst Town Library | Amherst, NH

While servant narratives have been popular for centuries, there seems to be a resurging interest in these stories in recent decades. Many contemporary British and North American writers, filmmakers, and television executives have turned to master/servant relationships as their subject matter. Films like The Remains of the Day and Gosford Park garnered numerous Oscar nominations and substantial box office profits. PBS created such classics as Upstairs, Downstairs and Manor House, as well as the phenomenally successful Downton Abbey!