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All the events listed in this calendar are funded in whole or part by New Hampshire Humanities, and all are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. Many of these events are Humanities to Go programs your organization can book, made possible in part by generous support from

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Saturday, February 2, 2019

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum | Warnre, NH

Who may tell Native American stories – and when may the stories be told? How did (and does) storytelling affect the lives of Native Americans? Can stories told by anyone in Native communities - or only by special medicine men and women?

Haldeman Center #41, Dartmouth College | Hanover, NH

Funded in part by New Hampshire Humanities, the Black Heritage Trail of NH will host two programs in their Elinor Williams Hooker Tea Talk programs. These dialogues act as a catalyst for deeper excavating of New Hampshire’s Black history, while also facilitating intellectual and communal connections between racism’s grip on our past and its contemporary manifestations.

Sunday, February 3, 2019

Lawrence Barn | Hollis, NH

In 1837, teenaged Victoria ascended to the British throne, untrained and innocent. Those who would try to usurp her power underestimated this self-willed intelligent young woman whose mettle sustained her through her 63-year reign. Using Queen Victoria's diary and letters, this program reveals the personal details of a powerful yet humane woman, who took seriously her role as monarch in a time of great expansion. She and her husband, Albert, set an example of high moral character and dedication, a novelty in the royal house after generations of scandal.

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Concord Public Library | Concord, NH

"Open Questions" is a new series of thought-provoking community conversations presented by New Hampshire Humanities. This series will explore essential questions about meaning and life that are important to Granite Staters. The first program will focus on the question “What Does it Mean to be an American?” The discussion will be facilitated by two philosophy professors from Saint Anselm College, Dr. Max Latona and Dr. Josh Tepley.

The event is free and open to the public, as part of our Humanities to Go program.

NH Theatre Project West | Portsmouth, NH

New Hampshire Theatre Project kicks off the 2019 season of its popular and provocative "Elephant in the Room" series, featuring play readings followed by facilitated community conversations on subjects that we as a society often have difficulty discussing. This month we'll use a play reading of "Eat: It's Not About the Food," written by Linda Daugherty, to examine issues and attitudes surrounding eating disorders, led by a facilitator and a panel of experts. This series is supported by a New Hampshire Humanities Community Project Grant.  

Other upcoming events in the series:

Saturday, February 9, 2019

The Pierce Manse | Concord, NH

Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the "Gettysburg Address." Along the way he comments on the debates with Stephen Douglas, his run for the presidency, and the Civil War.  

Sunday, February 10, 2019

Pembroke Town Library | Pembroke, NH

Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions, and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution. PLEASE NOTE THAT IN CASE OF SNOW ON 2/10/18, THE MAKE-UP DATE FOR THIS PROGRAM IS MONDAY, 2/11/2018 AT 7:00PM.

Monday, February 11, 2019

Amherst Congregational Church | Amherst, NH

This documentary tells the story of life in New Hampshire during the Second World War. Through interviews, historic news film, photos, and radio reports from the battlefields, this documentary and discussion facilitated by John Gfroerer chronicles how a nation, a state, and the citizens of New Hampshire mobilized for war.

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Dover High School | Dover, NH

Everyone faces challenges and adversity. Dover Listens invited the public to join storyteller Michael Lang on January 28 for an evening of learning how to share your own stories of resilience. All workshop participants will the opportunity to share their stories live at Warm Cookies and Community on February 12 at Dover High School.

*Please note: This event was originally scheduled for February 14 and had to be rescheduled to February 12. 

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Belknap Mill | Laconia, NH

This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. 

 

Old Webster Courthouse | Plymouth, NH

Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.  

 

George Holmes Bixby Memorial Library | Francestown, NH

Note: This program has been postponed. A new date has yet to be determined.

Friday, February 15, 2019

Walpole Town Hall | Walpole, NH

Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions, and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.

Saturday, February 16, 2019

Harvey Mitchell Library | Epping , NH

Woody Pringle and Marek Bennett present an overview of the American Civil War through the lens of period music. Audience members participate and sing along as the presenters explore lyrics, documents, and visual images from sources such as the Library of Congress. Through camp songs, parlor music, hymns, battlefield rallying cries, and fiddle tunes, Pringle and Bennett examine the folksong as a means to enact living history, share perspectives, influence public perceptions of events, and simultaneously fuse and conserve cultures in times of change.

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Dover High School | Dover, NH

Dover Listens invites you to an evening of storytelling and "Warm Cookies and Conversation," because our stories matter! Join us and share your story or sit back and listen to others as they tell their own stories of resilience, hope and connection. Hosted by Dover Listens, NH Listens, and Community Partners, and supported by New Hampshire Humanities.

Goffstown Public Library | Goffstown, NH

Deborah Anne Goss appears as Abby Hutchinson Patton, recalling mid-19th-century U.S. and New Hampshire history and performing rousing anthems, heartfelt ballads, and humorous ditties sung during anti-slavery and early women's rights struggles. In the 1840s and 1850s the Hutchinson Family Singers strongly influenced the opinions of the era with their popular songs promoting healthy living and social justice-most prominently the abolition of slavery. Participants are encouraged to join in the singing on several choruses or read a poem or political diatribe of the time.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Chichester Town Hall | Chichester, NH

Quilts tell stories, and quilt history is full of myths and misinformation as well as heart-warming tales of service and tradition. Nearly every world culture that has cold weather uses quilted textiles-quilting is NOT just an American art. Pam Weeks weaves world history, women's history, industrial history and just plain wonderful stories into her presentation. Participants are invited to bring one quilt for identification and/or story sharing.

Sunday, February 24, 2019

Tucker Free Library | Henniker, NH

In 1947, Edwin Way Teale, the most popular naturalist in the decade between Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson, followed the progress of spring over four months from the Everglades to the summit of Mount Washington. His best-selling book, North with the Spring, recounts the epic journey he and his wife Nellie undertook. In 2012, John Harris set out to retrace Teale's route, stopping at unfamiliar wild places on the same calendar date on which Teale visited.

Wilmot Community Association Red Barn | Wilmot, NH

Following World War II, New Hampshire embarked on an extensive program of constructing new highways and improving existing roads to accommodate explosive growth in passenger vehicles and the need for better infrastructure to accommodate commercial traffic. Hundreds of millions in federal, state, and local tax dollars would be expended on this initiative over the second half of the 20th century and road construction would become an enduring part of the state's economy.

Monday, February 25, 2019

Warner Town Hall | Warner, NH

This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. 

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Elkins Public Library | Canterbury, NH

The Vietnam War film and discussion program utilizes short videos and a trained facilitator to prompt discussion about the Vietnam era. Content is culled from Ken Burns' and Lynn Novick's PBS documentary, THE VIETNAM WAR, which tells the story of one of the most consequential and divisive events in American history. The videos explore the human dimensions of war that still haunt us today. Witnesses from all sides give their personal testimonies-Americans who fought in the war, those who opposed it, as well as combatants and civilians from North and South Vietnam.

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Red River Theatres | Concord, NH

The World Affairs Council of NH presents Finding Refuge, a three-part documentary film and discussion series funded by a New Hampshire Humanities project grant that will explore the global refugee crisis, which has left 68.5 million people forcibly displaced worldwide. Leaving the statistics behind, we will use film as a point of entry to explore how losing your home and community profoundly changes one's sense of identity, value and belonging. The film Human Flow gives a global, expansive view of the crisis, from staggering numbers to personal stories.

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Madbury Town Hall | Madbury, NH

Everyone knows that there's "something about lighthouses" that gives them broad appeal, but their vital role in our history and culture is little appreciated. Our early nation was built on maritime economy, and lighthouses were part of the system that made that possible. Due to automation, traditional lighthouse keeping is a way of life that has faded into the past. Jeremy D'Entremont tells the history of New England's historic and picturesque lighthouses primarily focusing on the colorful and dramatic stories of lighthouse keepers and their families.